PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 29/3/98


Welcome to this active site.Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation.Computer analysis will also be considered.Some of these positions will come from actual historical games.Others will be composed endgame studies,but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.


THIS WEEK 

  POSITION 33 

WHITE to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION : 8/p7/K5P1/8/2k1rP2/8/8/B7: 


LAST WEEK

Salo Flohr (1908-1983) was one of the great enigmatic figures of chess.We have time for one story.The young Flohr once went to visit a tournament in Berlin where he found chess was being played for stakes in the room next to the main tournament hall.In the next few days he took money from everyone including some of the masters who were playing in the tournament.In fact most of the prize money ended up in his pockets and he had to lend money to some of his victims so they could get home !!

Even his chess style was a bit of a mystery.In the early thirties his play was full of vigour and inventiveness and he soon became one of the strongest players in the world.In 1937 he was selected by F.I.D.E. as official challenger for the World Championship but the war years robbed him of a chance at the title.In later years he relied solely on his superior technique especially in the endgame but the sparkle had gone and his results declined.

POSITION 32

R. Domenech v S. Flohr  1935

Black to Play & WIN 

 

 :3r4/1pkr1ppp/2p1b3/2n1p3/p1P1PP2/P3K1P1/1P1NB2P/2RR4:

Black has a number of positional advantages:-

a) control of the d-file.

b) better pawn structure.

c) superior placed minor pieces.

This adds up to a winning advantage and Black is able to play a fine positional combination.

1...exf4+

2.gxf4 Rd3+ !

This is a temporary sacrifice of the exchange which leads to a clearly won ending.

3.Bxd3 Rxd3+

4.Kf2

4.Ke2 Bg4+ 5.Ke1 Bxd1 6.Rxd1 Nxe4 7.Nxe4 Re3+ 8.Kf2 Rxe4-+

4...Bg4

Black threatens 5...Bxd1 6.Rxd1 Rxd2+ 7.Rxd2 Nxe4+ followed by 8...Nxd2-+.White has no real alternative to what is played.

5.e5 Bxd1

6.Rxd1 Ne6!

The knight attacks the f-pawn.Not 6...Nb3? 7.Ke2 and White might just hold the draw.

7.f5 Nd4

8.f6 gxf6

9.exf6 Nb3

Black now simplifies into a won K & P ending.

10.Ke2 Rxd2+

11.Rxd2 Nxd2

12.Kxd2 Kd6

and Black wins the f-pawn and the game.Awesome technique !! It is not surprising that Flohr was able to hold both Euwe and Botvinnik to drawn matches.


Easter Endgame Solving Tournament starting on 5th April

This will consist of 4 positions, 2 of which will be easy to solve for newcomers.Winners names only and solutions will be published on 26th April.

CLOSING DATE 19th April.
NEW : I am starting a guest feature inviting you to send me a endgame position you find interesting and would like to share with others.It can be from a game or a endgame study (similar to those that have already appeared). Your comments and analysis, which can be computer aided, will be helpful.Your contribution will be acknowledged. THANKS


22/3/98

Position 31

15/3/98

Position 30

8/3/98

Position 29

1/3/98

Position 28

22/2/98

Position 27

15/2/98

Position 26

8/2/98

Position 25

1/2/98

Position 24

25/1/98

Position 23

18/1/98

Position 22

11/1/98

Position 21

4/1/98

Position 20

28/12/97

Position 19

21/12/97

Position 18

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS

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