PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 5/4/98


Welcome to this active site.Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation.Computer analysis will also be considered.Some of these positions will come from actual historical games.Others will be composed endgame studies,but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Neville Belinfante
Easter Endgame Solving Tournament has started !!

Both for Humans and Computers

Click here >> positions

CLOSING DATE 19th April.

This consists of 4 positions, 2 of which should be easy to solve for newcomers. Winners names and grades only will be published on 26th April plus solutions. All other competitors will have their grades sent via email.


I will be taking a short break over Easter, but will be back with a new position on SUNDAY 19th April. HAPPY EASTER

THIS WEEK 

POSITION   34

WHITE to Play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/3k4/p1p4p/1pP1r1pP/4P1P1/P3K3/2R5/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION  33

Hermann Mattison (1894-1932) was both a very strong chessplayer and an exellent study composer. He won the first Latvian championship in 1924 and the first FIDE world amateur championship in Paris in the same year. He played first board for the Latvian team at the Prague Olympiad in 1931 and he scored wins against Alekhine and Rubinstein. He composed over 60 studies, many of which are of great artistic value.

Mattison, 1927

WHITE to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION : 8/p7/K5P1/8/2k1rP2/8/8/B7: 

This study is not easy to understand because some of the play is far from obvious but it will repay careful study. Black can draw if he can get his King to f7 to help stop the pawns from queening. Pushing the pawn forward to g7 in the above position allows Black to set up this defensive position. After 1.g7? Re8 2.f5 Kd5 3.Bb2 Rg8 4.Kb7 Kd6 and the Black King will get to f7 and White will make no progress. Many computer programs do not recognise these drawn positions and their positive evaluations can be very misleading.

1.Be5! Re1

The Rook must go to the g-file to stop the pawn from queening.

2.g7 Rg1

3.Bf6 Kd5

Not so good is 3...Rg6 4.Kb7 (Taking the poisoned a-pawn will lead to a draw 4.Kxa7? Kd5 5.f5 Rg4 6.Kb8 Kd6 7.Kc8 Ra4=) 4...Kd5 5.f5 Rg1 6.Kc8 Ke4 7.Bg5!! Rxg5 8.f6+-

4.Bg5 Kc6

5.Ka5

Taking the a-pawn doesnt win because Black has time to set up a defensive position with his king on f7. 5.Kxa7? Kc7 6.Ka6 Kc6 7.Ka5 Ra1+ 8.Kb4 Ra8 9.Be7 Rg8 10.Bf8=

5...Ra1+

5...Kc5 6.Ka4 Ra1+ 7.Kb3 Rb1+ 8.Kc3 Rb8 9.Be7+ Kd5 10.Bf8 +-

6.Kb4 Rb1+

7.Kc4 Rb8

8.Be7!

This moves stops the Black King from getting to f7. The pawn move 8.f5 leads to a draw because of 8... Rc8! 9.f6 Kd6+ and the King reaches f7. Black is now forced to play Rg8.

8...Rg8

8...Kd7 9.Bf8 +- and the pawn queens.

9.Bf8 Kd7

10.Kd5 Ke8

11.Ke6!

11.Ke5? Kf7 12.f5 Rxf8 13.gxf8Q+ Kxf8=

11...Rxf8

12.f5! a5

13.f6 a4

14.f7+ 1-0

This ending is a very finely balanced duel with only one tempo making the difference between a win or a draw.


NEW : I am starting a guest feature inviting you to send me a endgame position you find interesting and would like to share with others.It can be from a game or a endgame study (similar to those that have already appeared). Your comments and analysis, which can be computer aided, will be helpful.Your contribution will be acknowledged. THANKS


29/3/98

Position 32

22/3/98

Position 31

15/3/98

Position 30

8/3/98

Position 29

1/3/98

Position 28

22/2/98

Position 27

15/2/98

Position 26

8/2/98

Position 25

1/2/98

Position 24

25/1/98

Position 23

18/1/98

Position 22

11/1/98

Position 21

4/1/98

Position 20

28/12/97

Position 19

21/12/97

Position 18

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