PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 26/4/98


Welcome to this active site.Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation.Computer analysis will also be considered.Some of these positions will come from actual historical games.Others will be composed endgame studies,but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks toValentin Albillo
THIS WEEK

POSITION 36

White to Play and Draw

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:7R/6K1/8/3qkP2/32:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 35

Edward Lasker (1885-1981 ) was another American writer/player who made a big impact on the game. Originally German he moved to the United States at the outbreak of the 1st World war. His first book, "Chess Strategy" which he wrote while he was still a student in Berlin, was an instant success. It was a practical book written to explain strategic principles to the emerging chess playing public. It can still be read with profit today.

Edward Lasker was never a full professional but he did play in a number of top class events. In 1923 he played a match against Marshall for the United States Championship and lost by a narrow margin. 

Ed Lasker v F Marshall, 1923

3rd Match Game

WHITE to Play & WIN  

  

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p4p2/4k2p/5p1P/6P1/2K2P2/2P5/8:

Does lightning strike twice? It did for Edward Lasker. Twice he had similar winning pawn endings in important championship games and each time he went wrong.

Lasker fancied his chances against Marshall. He was a player who was well passed his peak and his style was not suited to the trench warfare of long matches. Lasker won the first two games and then in the 3rd game came to the above ending. He had just played the longest combination he had ever conceived. He remembered the ending he played against Moll many years earlier.The pawn structure on the Kingside was similar. ( This was the 2nd position of the Easter Competition.) He remembered the win in the ending which he allowed to slip between his fingers. The winning idea is similar in each position and remarkably Lasker missed it each time.

1.g5!

[Lasker played 1.gxf5+? Kxf5 2.Kb4 and the result was a draw after a long ending.]

1...hxg5

2.h6 Kf6

[The King has to get into the square of the h-pawn.]

3.Kd4

[Crafty 12.9 (Valentin Albillo) found the earlier moves and now deviates with 3.Kd3 a5 4.c4 a4 5.c5 a3 6.h7 Kg7 7.Kc2 a2 8.Kb2 g4 9.c6 gxf3 10.c7 f2 11.h8Q+ Kxh8 12.c8Q++-]

3...g4

4.fxg4 fxg4

This is the position that Lasker had misjudged in his analysis and stopped him playing the winning g5 variation.The hullucination he had was that Black would Queen with check after forcing the White King to the first rank.He failed to realise that there was a symmetrical variation which forced Blacks King on to the back rank and because he now had the move he would queen first with check.

5.c4 g3

6.Ke3 a5

The pawns are equi-distant from the Queening squares.The Black King is now forced, by queening the h-pawn, to his first rank and then the c-pawn reaches home first with check.

7.h7 Kg7

8.c5 g2

9.Kf2 a4

10.c6 g1Q+

11.Kxg1 a3 12.h8Q+ Kxh8 13.c7 a2 14.c8Q+ and White wins.

Edward Lasker had a very long chess career with periodic breaks spanning over sixty years. He knew and played most of the great players of the first half of this century and his autobiography " Chess Secrets " makes fascinating reading. His humanity, honesty and integrity seems to be the hallmark of his writing.


Easter Endgame Solving Tournament

Click here >>Solutions


NEW : I am starting a guest feature inviting you to send me a endgame position you find interesting and would like to share with others.It can be from a game or a endgame study (similar to those that have already appeared). Your comments and analysis, which can be computer aided, will be helpful.Your contribution will be acknowledged. THANKS


21/4/98

Position 34

05/4/98

Position 33

29/3/98

Position 32

22/3/98

Position 31

15/3/98

Position 30

8/3/98

Position 29

1/3/98

Position 28

22/2/98

Position 27

15/2/98

Position 26

8/2/98

Position 25

1/2/98

Position 24

25/1/98

Position 23

18/1/98

Position 22

11/1/98

Position 21

4/1/98

Position 20

28/12/97

Position 19

21/12/97

Position 18

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS

mailto: brigosling@aol.com