PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 10/5/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies,but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.


Remembering DAVID HOOPER who died last Sunday.

One of the world's leading authorities on the endgame.

I AM SURE HE WOULD LIKE US TO ENJOY THE FOLLOWING ENDING HE COMPOSED IN 1961. A TRIBUTE WILL FOLLOW NEXT WEEK. 

 

POSITION 38

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:7k/7p/8/5p2/2K2P1P/24: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 37

In the early 1950's Tigran Petrosian (1929 -1984) emerged from the ranks of Soviet Masters to become a leading International Grandmaster. In the 19th USSR Championship he came equal second behind Keres which meant he qualified for the 1952 Interzonal Tournament to be held in Sweden. This was the beginning of Russian supremacy in these type of events. His game against the Hungarian Szabo in the 14th round was a very tense affair. They were both playing for one of the five candidate places and neither player could afford to lose at this critical stage in the tournament.

Szabo v Petrosian.

Stockholm 1952

Black to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:6k1/1pq3p1/pn1Q1p2/4pP1p/8/2P5/2P3P1/1K1R4:

Szabo has just played Qd6? This is a routine move he made without much thought. He incorrectly assesses the ending. He fails to realize that his f- and g-pawns will be difficult to defend. The Queens should have been retained and White would have kept a small advantage.The young Petrosian seizes his opportunity:-

1...Qxd6

2.Rxd6 Nc4!

The Knight now becomes very active.

3.Rd7?

This move looks strong but the Rook should have been played to d3 to help with the defence of the g- and f-pawns.

3...b5

4.Ra7 Ne3

5.Rxa6 Nxg2

6.Kc1 h4

Black cannot queen the h-pawn but it will be exchanged for the f-pawn.

7.Kd2 h3

8.Ra1 Nh4

Black now wins the f-pawn.

9.c4 bxc4

10.Rh1 Nxf5

11.Kc3 Nd6

12.Rxh3 Kf7

13.Rh7 f5

14.Kb4

White makes a token counter attack but the e- and f-pawns prove too strong. 14...f4 15.Kc5 f3 16.Rh1 [The Knight cannot be taken. 16.Kxd6 f2 17.Rh1 e4 18.Rf1 e3 19.Kd5 Ke7 20.Kxc4 e2-+] 16...e4. White resigns. A beautiful ending by Petrosian.

Kotov was first in the Tournament followed by Petrosian and Taimanov, Geller was 4th. Szabo and Averbakh were among a group of four players who shared fifth place but it was decided to allow these players into the Candidates Tournament. So Szabo despite losing this game made it after all. Petrosian went througth the Tournament without a single defeat and for this achievement was awarded the title of International Grandmaster.

Petrosian as a young player made a deep study of Nimzowitsch's teaching and this influence can be seen in many of his games. If you are looking for strategies you can use when playing against computer programs then I think Petrosian can teach us much, especially about plans to adopt in closed and blocked positions.

 
Easter Endgame Solving Tournament

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Summer Solving Tournament starting in July and lasting for six weeks. Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !!


03/5/98

Position 36

28/4/98

Position 35

21/4/98

Position 34

05/4/98

Position 33

29/3/98

Position 32

22/3/98

Position 31

15/3/98

Position 30

8/3/98

Position 29

1/3/98

Position 28

22/2/98

Position 27

15/2/98

Position 26

8/2/98

Position 25

1/2/98

Position 24

25/1/98

Position 23

18/1/98

Position 22

11/1/98

Position 21

4/1/98

Position 20

28/12/97

Position 19

21/12/97

Position 18

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