PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 7/6/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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THIS WEEK

POSITION 42

White to Play & WIN 

 

    FORSYTH NOTATION:8/8/5Pr1/3R4/pp6/8/k2B4/2K5: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 41

Samuel Reshevsky (1911-1996) was probably the greatest child prodigy in the history of the game. Born in Poland he later settled in the USA. At the age of eight he was touring Europe and America giving simultaneous exhibitions against twenty or more players and hardly ever losing. In one such event held at the Illinios Athletic Club in Chicago a crowd of fifteen hundred people turned out to watch this boy who was fast becoming a legend. There was a danger that because of his fame Reshevsky would be continually exploited but fortunately the philanthropist, Julius Rosenwald took an interest in him and made sure he had a proper education.

Sometimes a prodigy doesn't come through at the senior level when he gets older but this was not true of Reshevsky. In 1935 he played in a tournament at Margate and beat the former World Champion, Capablanca to take 1st place. In the following year he played in the strong Nottingham tournament and came equal 3rd. Position 41 is taken from this tournament.

 Alekhine v Reshevsky

Nottingham 1936 

Black to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/3n4/2n3pp/1p1kp3/5P1N/4K1P1/1B5P/8:

A few moves before this position had been reached Alekhine had made a terrible error which had thrown away the draw. Black still has to be careful because if white can exchange off his pawns he could sacrifice one of his pieces for the remaining Black pawn and still draw. Therefore Black's plan is to push the b-pawn as quickly as possible and avoid furthur simplification.

1...Nb6!

[This is the most direct way to win.The other Knight comes over to the Queen-side to help with the advance of the b-pawn, but other roads also lead to Rome:

1...exf4+ 2.gxf4 Ne7 3.Kd2 b4 4.Bg7 g5 5.Ng2 Nf5 6.fxg5 hxg5 7.Ba1 and Black has to take care. 1...Ne7 2.Bxe5 Nxe5 3.fxe5 Kxe5 4.Kd3 g5 5.Nf3+ Kd5 6.Nd4 b4 7.h3 and still the win is not easy.]

2.Bc1

[2.Bxe5 Nxe5 3.fxe5 Nc4+ 4.Kd3 Nxe5+ 5.Kc3 Ke4 the b-pawn is used as a decoy and the Black King goes for the g + h pawns. 6.Ng2 g5 7.h4 g4 8.Ne1 Ke3 9.Nc2+ Kf2-+]

2...Nc4+

3.Kf2

[3.Kd3? e4+ and the pawns look very powerful; 3.Ke2? Nd4+ 4.Kd1 e4 5.Nxg6 e3-+]

3...Nb4!

4.Ke2 Na2

5.Bd2 b4

[The pawn marches on.]

6.fxe5 b3

7.Kd1 Nxe5!

[White was hoping for 7...b2? 8.Kc2 Nxd2 9.Kxb2 Nb4 10.Kc3=]

8.Ng2

[8.Nxg6 also looses 8...Nxg6 9.Bxh6 Ne5 10.Bc1 Nxc1 11.Kxc1 Nc4-+]

8...Ke4

9.h4 Nd3

10.Ba5 Nb2+

0-1

White resigns because the b-pawn cannot be stopped. Reshevsky was making a habit of beating ex-champions. A few rounds later he beat the aging Lasker.

In the Nottingham Tournament Reshevsky played a number of fine endings. He beat Bogolyubov in a similar ending to the one above and Alexander in a long Queen and pawn ending. Even as a prodigy giving simultaneous displays he was an excellent endgame player. In fact one of his best games was an ending which he played when he was 9 against R.B.Griffith which was one of 8 clock games played simultaneously !!


Easter Endgame Solving Tournament

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Summer Solving Tournament starting in July and lasting for six weeks. Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !!


01/6/98

Position 40 Korn

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Position 39 Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38 Hooper

 

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