PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 21/6/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK 

POSITION 44

White to Play & DRAW  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:7r/p3k3/2p5/1pPp4/3P4/PP4P1/ 3P1PB1/2K5: 

HINT. A hint is given at the bottom of the page to help those who find this ending difficult or who are new to solving. Only use the hint if you are completly stumped !!

LAST WEEK, POSITION 43

Dus-Chotimirsky (1879-1965) was a Soviet player with an attacking style which gained him victories over some of the world's strongest players. In the St Petersburg tournament of 1909 he beat both Lasker and Rubinstein.

He always claimed that before the Revolution he was Alekhine's chess teacher and there seems to be strong circumstantial evidence to indicate that this was indeed the case.

He played in a number of Soviet Championships and shared third place on two occassions in the 1920's. In his final appearance in the Championships in 1933 he was involved in a strange incident. He was playing Botvinnik and the game came down to just a King and Rook each on the board. Instead of agreeing to a draw Dus decided to play on and many more moves were played. The game was only stopped by the intervention of the tournament committee !!

Suchting v Dus-Chotimirsky

Prague 1908

Black to Play & WIN  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION: 8/pB3b2/3p1Npp/1p6/P2kP3/1P3K1P/6P1/2b5:

Just before this position was reached Dus had activated his King and played it to its commanding position. Black with the advantage of the two Bishops plus his centralised King has an easy win.

1...Bxb3!

[1...bxa4? 2.bxa4 Bb3 3.a5 Bg5 4.Nd5 Bd1+ 5.Kf2 Bc2 6.Nc7 Bxe4 7.Nb5+ and Backs advantage is minimal.]

2.axb5

[This exchange is not equal. The White b-pawn is vulnerable to attack.]

2...Bd1+

3.Kf2 Ba4

4.Ne8

[Trying to defend the b-pawn is futile. 4.Bc6? a6!-+; 4.Ba6? and the Bishop is out of the game and Black has a overwhelming advantage.]

4...Bxb5

[The passed pawn on a7 will quickly become a dangerous weapon]

5.Nxd6

[White has a passed e-pawn but it is ineffective. A White Bishop will control its queening square.]

5...Bd3

6.Kf3 a5

7.Nf7-+

[Better is 7.Bc6! Kc5 8.Nf7 Bc2 (8...Kxc6? 9.Ne5+ Kb5 10.Nxd3) 9.Bd5 but Black is still winning.]

7...a4

8.e5

[White really has nothing else. 8.Bd5?a3 9.Nd6 Bxe4+ 10.Nxe4 Kxd5 11.Nc3+ Kc4 12.Na2-+ Bb2 and White can resign.]

8...a3

9.e6 a2

10.e7 Bb5

11.Nd6 Ba4

White cannot stop the a-pawn whereas its own e-pawn cannot make any progress. The Bishop controls the queening square so white resigned. A fine ending by a player better known for his attacking play than his endgame prowess.


Easter Endgame Solving Tournament

Click here >> winners + solutions

Summer Solving Tournament starting * July 4th * and lasting for six weeks. Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !!


 

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper


HINT: P44 White gives up his Bishop in order to build a fortress postion.

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS

mailto: brigosling@aol.com