PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 28/6/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK 

POSITION 45

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:1r6/1p1bk1pp/p1nNp3/2R1P3/1P6/P5P1/6BP/6K1: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 44

Vitaly Chekhover, 1908-1965 was an active player in the 1930's. He achieved his best results in 1936 when he came equal first in two important Soviet tournaments. That year he also decided to start composing endgame studies.

He contributed new ideas in positions which had a natural appearance and he was soon considered to be one of Russia's great composers.

Chekhover became an important member of a team of theoreticians headed by Averbakh who prepared a kind of encyclopedia of endings. This work is known in the West as Comprehensive Chess Endings and was published in five volumes by Pergamon Press in the 1980's. This series of books is a translation of the second Russian edition and is looked upon as the standard work on endgame theory. Although a brilliant work some of this material will have to be revised in the light of recent computer discoveries.

V Chekover 1947

White to Play & DRAW  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:7r/p3k3/2p5/1pPp4/3P4/PP4P1/ 3P1PB1/2K5:

The first moves of this study will make little sense unless you understand the concept of building a fortress. White creates a barrier or defensive wall so that his opponent cannot penetrate into his position. But paradoxically in this position White first allows the enemy Rook into his position but only because he wants to gain contol of important defensive squares.

1.Kd1!

[At first it would appear that White has equality with three extra pawns for the disadvantage of having only a bishop for the Rook. But deeper analysis reveals:-

1.Kc2? Rh2! 2.Bf1 Rxf2 3.Bd3 Rg2-+;

1.g4? Rh2 2.Bf3 Rh3-+;

1.Bf3? Rf8 2.Bd1 (2.Bh5 Rxf2 3.g4 Rg2-+) 2...Rxf2 3.g4 Rg2 4.Kc2 Rg3 and the King is cut off fom the d-pawn and Black wins by playing his King to e4.]

1...Rh2

2.Ke1!

[Chekover's solution to this position seems unbelievible !! Is 2.Ke1 a beginners mistake? He sacrifices a bishop in order to drive the Rook out of his position and to gain time so that his King guards the key squares in order to build the barrier.]

2... Rxg2

3.Kf1 Rh2

4.Kg1 Rh3

5.Kg2 Rh5

[The Rook is driven away and White completes his fortress.]

6.f3! Kf6

7.Kg1 Rh8

8.Kg2 Re8

9.Kf2 Kf5

10.Kf1 =

Black cannot enter the fortress. The idea of sacrificing the Rook on e4 doesn't work. 10... Re4?? 11.fxe4+ Kxe4 12.Kg2 and White has a won ending.

Conventional chess programs have a problem with fortress type positions because the usual material assessments no longer count. The Rook in the above final position is useless because it has no unguarded entry points into White's position.

This is another example of what I call image positions. In certain positions the human eye can see what is required quicker than the most powerful computer. This is because these images are processed immediately by the brain. Their understanding doesn't depend on the power of calculation. These type of positions are usually strategic in nature and often depend on the pawn structure.

The human brain relying on image analysis rather than calculating power is quicker and can see at a glance that the position is drawn. 


Summer Solving Tournament starting * July 4th * and lasting for six weeks. Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !!

A SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count .The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
 

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper


HINT: P45 Beware of the trap!

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