PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY . 4/7/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 46

White to Play

What Result ?

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/8/6k1/p7/P4KP1/8/8/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 45

The year 1938 was very important to Reubin Fine. Although only twenty-three years old he had decided that his professional chess career was coming to an end. With this decision made he entered the Dutch AVRO tournament knowing it would probably be his last international appearance. It was generally accepted that the winner of the tournament would have the right to play a title match against Alekhine. Fine made a brilliant start and was soon the tournament leader but he lost his form and had to be content to share 1st place with Keres, but Keres had the better Sonnenborn-Berger score and so was looked upon as the official challenger to the world champion.

This must have been a bitter disappointment to Reubin Fine and only reinforced his earlier decision to follow a career in psychiatry. Fine had started a college course but he still found time that year to play in the United States Championship where the following position is taken from.

Fine v Kashdan, 1938

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:1r6/1p1bk1pp/p1nNp3/2R1P3/1P6/P5P1/6BP/6K1: 

 

White has the better placed pieces and now can win a pawn by a neat combination.

1.Nxb7! Rxb7

2.Bxc6 Rc7

3.Be4!

[not 3.Bxd7?? Rxc5 4.bxc5 Kxd7 5.Kf2 Kc6 6.Ke3 Kxc5-+ and Back wins the K&P ending.]

3...Rxc5

[Back had to exchange Rooks, any other move would have lost the h-pawn.]

4.bxc5 h6

[The c-pawn is safe from attack, White now brings his King over to the Q-side to win the a-pawn.]

5.Kf2 Kd8

6.Ke3 Kc7

7.Kd4 a5

8.Bd3 Be8

9.Bc4 Bd7

The rest is easy; 10.Bb3 Bc8 11.Ba4 Bb7 12.Kc4 Ba6+ 13.Bb5 Bb7 14.Kb3 and the a-pawn will fall.

Although Fine's international career was over he started to write chess books. The most famous of these is Basic Chess Endings (1941). I cannot speak too highly of this book and it is a great pity that it has never been revised. Botvinnik called it "a brilliant piece of work." It stands as a monument to one of  America's greatest players.


(The Summer Endgame Solving Tournament has started !! Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !!

Both for Humans and Computers.

Humans who take part are automatically entered for the Millennium Prize (see below)

Click here >> positions

CLOSING DATE 23rd August

This consists of 5 positions, Top grades only will be published on 6th September plus solutions. All other competitors will have their grades sent via email.


A SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start now. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
I will now be taking a short break (climbing a few mountains !!) but will be back with a new position on
SUNDAY 19th July.
 

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper


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