PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 30/8/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo

THIS WEEK

POSITION 53

Black to play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:4r3/p4k2/1p1b2p1/2pP1p1p/2Pn1P1P/3B3P/P2B1K2/1R6:

 

LAST WEEK, POSITION 52

In 1910 Alexei Troitzky (1866-1942) wrote an important article, published in the St Petersburg paper "Niva" in which he laid down the principles for the composing of studies. Much of what he said then remains valid to the present day. He emphasized the importance of an introduction and the central function of an idea or theme. Troitzky was interested in problems as well as endgame studies so it is not surprising that problem themes often occured in his endgame compositions. The following study illustates the Roman Theme.

Troitzky, 1937

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:k7/B6r/8/3K4/8/2Rp4/B1p5/8:

The King being in the corner will be opened to mating attacks but Black hopes his two passed pawns will be more than difficult to cope with.

The Bishop is attacked so comes back to stop the advance of the d-pawn.

1.Be3 d2!

This d-pawn has to be taken. The Rook check 1...Rd7+ with the idea of supporting the pawn is no good because of White's strong attack. 2.Kc6! d2 (2...c1Q 3.Rxc1 d2 4.Rd1+-) 3.Ra3+ Kb8 4.Bf4+ and white mates in two moves.

2.Bxd2 Rd7+

3.Kc6 Rxd2

4.Kc7! ...

A beautiful quiet move with the King and White now threatens mate on the a-file. Not 4.Bd5? Kb8 5.Be6 c1Q 6.Rxc1 Rb2! and Black escapes with a theoretical draw. According to the Thompson database 6...Rb2! is the only move to draw.

4... c1Q

This move pins the rook and stops the threat of mate on the a-file. The bishop is also attacked. 4...Rd3 is no good because of 5.Rxc2 Ka7 6.Bb3+-

5.Bd5+!! ...

This is the only move that wins. If 5.Rxc1? Black now takes the Bishop and stops the mating threat on the a-file 5...Rxa2 =. This position with the Rook at a2 is important in the understanding of the Roman Theme.( See later ) Compare it with the position after blacks 6th move.

5... Rxd5

The rook is deflected. Not 5...Ka7? 6.Rxc1 Ka6 7.Rc5+- and there is no escape for black.

6.Rxc1 Ra5

Black stops the threat of mate but now White has a powerful double attack.

7.Kb6!! ...

White threatens to (a) win the Rook (b) mate the King on the back rank. Both threats cannot be met so 1-0. We have seen this finish before in the famous Saavedra Study

Crafty 12.9 Valentin Albillo (Unix - no endgame tablebases) finds the main line of the study. 1. Be3 d2 2. Bxd2 Rd7+ 3. Kc6 Rxd2 4. Kc7 c1=Q 5. Bd5+ Rxd5 6. Rxc1 Ra5 7. Kb6 Rb5+ 8. Kxb5 Value: +9.480 Depth: 19/23 plies Time: 1 min. 26 seconds.

You are probably wondering what is the Roman Theme  and how does this study illustrate it?

The RomanTheme takes its name from a chess problem composed by Kohtz and Kockelkorn in 1906 which showed this theme and was dedicated to a resident in Rome.

We can define the theme as: A Black piece which in its original position has a good defence against White's threat but allows itself to be decoyed to a less advantageous square. In its new situation if the same threat appears the Black piece in order to cope has to weakens its position.

In the above study the Rook is the decoyed piece, by White playing 5.Bd5!! the Black Rook has to take this piece so is decoyed to a less advantageous square. From the analysis we see that Black stops the threat of mate on the a-file by playing ...Ra5 but cannot cope with White's double attack. If the Rook had never been decoyed and White played 5.Rxc1? the Bishop would have been captured by ...Rxa2 thus guarding against the threat of mate and reaching a drawn position.


  Summer Endgame Solving Tournament

Solutions and names of Winners 6/9/98

Click here >> Positions


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Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
 

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