PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 6/9/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo

THIS WEEK

POSITION 54 

White to play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/5B2/8/8/p6K/4B3/pn6/1k6: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 53

Frank Marshall (1877-1944) was one of the great chess figures of this century. He was a brilliant tournament player with many successes but his dashing style did not suit the long grind involved in matches. This was evident in his flawed bid for the World Championship against Lasker in 1907 when he didn't win any games.

Marshall was completely devoted to chess and besides playing, he organised events and encouraged young players. He had a very outgoing and likeable personality and its not surprising that his creation, the Marshall Chess Club of New York, became a great success.

Mason v Marshall

Paris 1900

Black to play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:4r3/p4k2/1p1b2p1/2pP1p1p/2Pn1P1P/3B3P/P2B1K2/1R6:

Black has a big positional plus in this ending. The knight at d4 is beautifully placed and the Black Bishop will become active. In contrast the White Bishops are passive. As the position is closed they have no promising diagonals on which to operate. Also White's kingside pawns are weak. Black now converts his positional superiority to a material one.

1...Be7!

The Bishop points to the main weakness in Whites camp.

2.Kg3?...

This is a terrible move. The pawn at h4 cannot be saved.The King should be played to g2. White should then think about advancing his a-pawn and counter- attacking along the b-file.

2...Bxh4+!

3.Kxh4? ...

The King should still be played to g2, now all of Whites moves are forced to meet Blacks threats.

3... Nf3+

4.Kg3 Nxd2

5.Rd1 Re3+

6.Kf2 Rxd3

7.Ke2 Rxh3

8.Kxd2 Rf3

It is amazing how quickly Whites game has collapsed

9.d6 Rxf4

and White resigned.

In this tournament held in Paris, Marshalls approach was quite different than usual. Instead of the violent attacks which up to then had been his hallmark he sought to get the Queens off the board and go into endings. In the 6th round he beat the world champion Em Lasker in a long ending. This caused a sensation at the time but was to be the only time he defeated Lasker in a tournament game. Despite this defeat Lasker won the tournament ahead of Pillsbury with Marshall coming equal third with Maroczy. This was a brilliant start for the young American's international career and indicated that he was capable of becoming a world class player.


 

Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 13th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
 

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Position 38

Hooper

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