PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 13/9/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo and Radu Murgescu


THIS WEEK

POSITION 55 

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION :2r5/1p1k1p2/p2p2p1/P1PPnp1p/1P1K1N1P/5P2/4R1P1/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 54 

The Platov brothers from Moscow played a leading role in the development of the endgame study. They published most of their work as joint compositions but occasionally they worked independently of each other. Mikail Platov (1883-1938) was probably not so creative as his brother Vasily, but his studies still make a deep impression. They are fairly easy to follow because there is usually just one main line.

Mikail Platov

Shakhmaty, 1924

White to play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/5B2/8/8/p6K/4B3/pn6/1k6: 

 The composer tries to illustrate the Indian Theme. This idea first occured in a problem composed by the Rev Henry Loveday (1815-1848) in 1844 when he was Minister of the beautiful Church of St James, in Delhi, India. This theme could easily have been named after its creator but it generally became known as the Indian chess problem. The Platov brothers were probably the first composers to present it in a study-like setting but Troitzky was also experimenting with the Theme. In fact Troitzky had published a very similar study to this one in his collection of 500 Endspielstudien in 1924.

1.Bg6+! ...

[The King has to be driven into the corner or White will have to give up a Bishop to stop the creation of a new Queen.]

1... Ka1

[1...Nd3?? 2.Bxd3+ Kb2 3.Bd4+ Kb3+-]

2.Bh6...

[ 2.Bd4? a3= ]

2...a3

[ 2...Nc4 will lead to the main line; 3.Bg7+ Nb2 4.Kg5 a3 5.Kf6 .]

3.Kg5! ...

[The White army cannot win without the help of the King so he heads for the citical diagonal a1-h8; it is this King walk along the diagonal which creates a deep artistic impression.]

3...Nc4

4.Bg7+ Nb2

5.Kf6! ...

[This move sets up the royal battery and also unpins the knight so that the threat of stale mate is lifted.This forced pinning and unpinning of the Knight is a feature of the next few moves as the White King closes in on the Black monarch.]

5... Nc4

6.Ke6+ Nb2

7.Ke5 Nd1

8.Kd5+ ...

[Crafty 12.9 (Valentin albillo) found the early moves and now deviates with 8.Kd4?! Kb2 9.Kc4+ Kc1 10.Kb3 a1N+ 11.Bxa1 Kd2 12.Kxa3 and this is a win in 53 moves according to KenThompson's KBBKN database. It obviously would have found the mate in the main line at 38 plies if it was given a longer evaluation time.]

8...Nb2

9.Kd4 Nd1

10.Kc4+ Nb2+

11.Kc3! ...

(and White mates in 8 moves) 11...Nd1+ 12.Kb3+ Nb2 13.Bh6 Nd1 14.Kxa3 Nb2 15.Kb3 Nd3 16.Bf5 Nb2 17.Bc2 Nd3 18.Bg7+ Nb2 19.Bxb2#

This is a brilliant study, but it is not without a small blemish. Shortly after it was published Troitzky suggested the White King should be placed at g7. As it stands it does not illustrate the true Indian Theme. This can be defined as:

A line piece ( the Bishop ) is moved across a critical square ( in this case f6 ), another piece ( the White King ) is moved to this square, creating a battery and then moved again to unmask the piece that was first moved.

In the above study the dark-squared Bishop does not cross the critical square f6 so technically it does not illustrate the Indian theme. Troitzky's improvement, the King at g7, overcame this small blemish. The opening moves are now: 1.Bg6+ Ka1 2.Kf7 Nc4(d1) 3.Bd4+ ! ( the beginning of the Indian maneouvre) 3...Nb2 4.Bg7! ( This is the critical move; the Bishop crosses the critical square f6 ) 4...a3 5.Kf6 and we are now into the main line as above. So in the end this study became a joint composition between M Platov and A Troitzky !! 


Congratulations to Radu Murgescu of Ohio Wesleyan University who found the winning idea of pos 54. He asked me about having more solving contests. At present I run a competition every 3 to 4 months to coincide with vacations when people have more time to give to these events, if there was a demand this could be changed.

Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 13th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
 

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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