PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 20/9/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
THIS WEEK

POSITION 56 

White to play & DRAW

  

FORSYTH NOTATION:5k2/1p3p2/1P3PPK/8/5p1p/4p2P/B3PP1p/5r2:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 55 

In 1951 David Bronstein drew a match for the World Championship against Botvinnik but the champion retained the title in accordance with FIDE rules. Bronstein often had the advantage in the middlegame positions against Botvinnik but somehow lacked the will to convert these to wins in the final session.

David Bronstein is renowned for his friendliness and sociability and is universally liked by chess players everywhere. 

Bronstein v Olafsson

Portoroz, 1958

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION :2r5/1p1k1p2/p2p2p1/P1PPnp1p/1P1K1N1P/5P2/4R1P1/8: 

In the first half of this century Soviet theoreticians and endgame composers did a lot of analysis of Knight verses Rook endings.They looked at positions, due to the placing of the pieces or the position of pawns, where the Knight had a draw or definite advantage against the Rook. It is no wonder that the exchange sacrifice in the ending soon became an important weapon for the top Soviet players. After the exchange sacrifice in the above position White has a big positional plus. His pieces become active; his King soon invades the enemy position. Black loses valuable time trying to activate his Rook.

 1.Rxe5!! dxe5+

2.Kxe5 Re8+

[ If Black plays passively then White wins by advancing his pawns. 2...Ke7? 3.d6+ Ke8 4.Nd5. White is threatening d7+ followed by a fork with the knight. 4...Rd8 5.Nb6 Kf8 6.Kd5 Ke8 7.c6 bxc6+ 8.Kxc6 Kf8 9.Kc7 Ke8 10.d7++- ]

3.Kf6 Re3

4.Kxf7 Rb3

5.Nxg6 Rxb4

6.Ne5+ Kc8

[ If 6...Kd8 7.d6 Rb2 8.Ke6 Rd2 9.g3 Rd1 10.Kxf5+- ]

7.d6 Rb2

[ If 7...Rxh4 8.Ke7 Rd4 9.Nd7 Rd2 10.Nf6 h4 11.d7+ Kc7 12.Ne8++- ]

8.Ke8 Rd2

9.Ng6 Kb8

10.g3 Rd1

11.Ne7...

and Black resigns.

For his play Bronstein was awarded the prize for the best ending of the tournament.

In recent years David Bronstein has had some success in adapting his style to play against computers. He relies more on positions which require positional intuition rather than tactical skill. He likes to sacrifice a pawn for a superior position to try and confuse the programs evaluation function . He has had a life long interest in computers so it is not surprising that he enjoys playing against them.


Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 13th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
 

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Position 38

Hooper

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