PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 27/9/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
THIS WEEK

POSITION 57 

Black to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p5pk/1p3pbp/2p5/2P5/1P2PBPP/P6K/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 56 

Leonid Kubbel (1891-1942) saw himself firstly as a problemist but his endgame studies were special and they made him famous. His early studies were compiled when he was only 13 years old and he showed tremendous talent. With the early composers; Troitsky, and the Platov brothers he explored and added the strategic themes of the problemists to the genre of the endgame study.

Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1934

White to play & DRAW

  

FORSYTH NOTATION:5k2/1p3p2/1P3PPK/8/5p1p/4p2P/B3PP1p/5r2:  

White's position is critical. Black is threatening to Queen the h-pawn. He must attack without any delay.

1.g7+! ...

Taking the f-pawn with the Bishop doesn't work because Black can sacrifice his Rook for the dangerous g-pawn and then bring his new Queen into the game: 1.Bxf7? Rg1 2.fxe3 h1=Q 3.Be6 Rxg6!! 4.Kxg6 fxe3 5.Bf5 Qc6 -+.

1... Kg8

2.Bd5! ...

White wants to play the Bishop to the b1-h7 diagonal to threaten mate. Other Bishop moves will not do: 2.Bb3? Rc1 3.Bd5 h1Q 4.f3 Rc6!! A beautiful move which clears a path for the Queen 5.Bxc6 Qa1-+ and Black wins the f6 pawn and the game; 2.Bc4? Rd1 3.Bb3 Rd2-+ and White has no more threats.

2... h1Q

3.f3 ...

How is Black to stop the threatened mate with the Bishop going to h7 via e4?

3... Ra1!

This move illustrates the theme of the study. Black makes a Bristol Clearance. His Rook moves beyond b1 so that the Queen can reach this square.

4.Be4 Qb1!

This lifts the threat of mate and White looks lost but he has a little trick up his sleeve.

5.Bf5!! ...

A tremendous finale. Black is in Zugswang. He cannot escape the stalemate.

5... Qxf5=

This is the only sensible move. If he gives up the Queen Black has to sacrifice the Rook to draw. 5...Ra5 6.Bxb1 Rh5+ 7.Kxh5=; 5...Ra2 6.Bxb1 Rc2 7.Bxc2=

The Bristol clearance theme was introduced to the world by Frank Healey (1828-1906) when he won first prize in a Bristol composing tourney in 1861. His winning problem showed this idea:

One piece ( the Rook) clears a line for another ( the Queen ), the first piece cannot leave the rank so must go along it and pass beyond the square ( b1 ) where the second piece will land.

When this problem appeared it caused the same kind of sensation that had greeted the arrival of the Indian Problem some seventeen years earlier.

One cannot speak too highly of the influence that Leonid Kubbel has had on the world of study composition. The modern student must get to grips with his work if he really is to progress and enjoy this art form. It is a sobering thought indeed to think that Troitzky and Leonid Kubbel and his two brothers died in the terrible siege of Leningrad in 1942.


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
ARCHIVES
 

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS

mailto: brigosling@aol.com