PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 4/10/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo of Spain
THIS WEEK

POSITION 58 

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:6R1/3r3p/5pP1/8/p1p5/8/2P2K1k/8: 
LAST WEEK, POSITION 57 

Paul Keres (1916-1975) from Estonia was for many years one of the strongest players in the world. In 1938, Keres came equal first with Reuben Fine at the Dutch AVRO tournament which was looked upon as the unofficial Candidates tournament for the World Championship. Keres had the better Sonnenborn-Berger score so he was declared the winner. It was generally accepted that Keres would have the right to play a title match against Alekhine but the outbreak of the Second World war brought negotiations to an end.

After the war Keres became a Soviet citizen due to Estonia being returned to the U.S.S.R. He won the Soviet Championship three times: 1947, 1950 and 1951 and finished runner up five times in the various Candidates tournaments. He was the Crown Prince of chess but destined never to be the King.

 Smyslov v Keres

Soviet Championship, 1951

Black to Play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p5pk/1p3pbp/2p5/2P5/1P2PBPP/P6K/8:

In his early career Keres was a combinative player. He loved complications and tactics. But as he grew older his style began to change. He played more positionally. He still loved attacking chess but now he took fewer risks; he sought small advantages and looked to win in the ending.

Whites pawns on the queenside are weak because they are open to attack. In winning this ending Keres shows brilliant technique.

1...Bb1!

This maneuvre will force the White Bishop to take up a passive position at d1.

2.a3 ...

2... a5!

Preventing b4 and so fixing the opponents b and c-pawns on the same colour squares as the White Bishop.

3.Bd1 ...

This prevents Bc2 but the Bishop is in a passive position, but White has no real choice.

3...Kg6

Both sides bring their Kings to the centre of the board.

4.Kg2 Kf5

5.Kf3 Ke5

6.a4 ...

Keres in his notes to this game suggests 6.h4 as an improvement but he shows it still loses.

6... g5

7.Ke2 Bf5!

This move forces more pawns on the same colour as the Bishop.

8.g4 ...

8.h4? Bg4+! 9.Kd2 Bxd1 10.Kxd1-+

8... Bb1

9.Kf3 f5

10.gxf5 Kxf5

The h-pawn has now become vulnerable.White has weaknesses on both sides of the board.

11.Kf2 Be4

12.Kg3 Kg6!

The King comes back to support the advance of the h-pawn.

13.Kf2 h5

14.Kg3 h4+

15.Kf2 Bf5

16.Kg2 ...

White has too many weaknesses to defend; the King now invades with impunity.

16... Kf6

17.Kh2 Ke6

White Resigned. He no doubt saw the following moves: 18.Kg2 Ke5 19.Kh2 Bb1 20.Kg2 Ke4 21.Kf2 Kd3 22.Kf3 Kd2 23.Be2 Bf5 24.Bf1 Kc3 and the Queenside pawns are lost.

Computer analysis indicates the extent of this great technical achievement by Keres in winning this difficult ending. Crafty 12.9 Unix (Valentin Albillo ) came up with the same moves as the game continuation (Depth: 34 plies) and never deviates from Kere's plan. It also shows that Smyslov found the best moves in defence.


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
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