PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.11/10/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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Thanks to Valentin Albillo of Spain
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

THIS WEEK,

POSITION 59

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION :8/3q4/5P2/4P1N1/pk1P1K2/1p6/1P1N4/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 58

Aleksey Selesniev (1888-1967) was both a player of master strength and a gifted endgame composer. He played in a number of pre-revolutionary tournaments at the Moscow Chess Club when Alekhine was beginning to make a name for himself. He was a member of the delegation of Russian players that played in the ill fated Mannheim Tournament and who found themselves interned for the duration of the First World War. (Except for Alekhine who somehow managed to escape.) After the war Selesniev along with some of the other masters decided to stay in Germany.

In 1920 he was honoured by the then World Champion, Em Lasker who edited a book of his studies. ( 35 Endspielstudie von Schachmeister A. Selesnieff, by Em. Lasker ) In 1923 he had his best OTB result when he came 4th at Moravska Ostrava tournament ahead of a host of world class players. A year later Seleniev returned home to a country that had radically changed in his absence. By the late 20's he seemed to drop out of the chess scene. Many chess authorities never mention him or tell of his fate?

Selesniev, 1914

 White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:6R1/3r3p/5pP1/8/p1p5/8/2P2K1k/8: 

1.Rh8! ...

White's only hope is the g-pawn so he can't afford to lose it. This move is best, pinnning the h-pawn and threatening to exchange the Rooks with 2.Rxh7+ winning.

1... Rd2+

2.Kf1! ...

If the King moves up the board Black can draw by getting the Rook behind the pawn and trading his a-pawn for this dangerous pawn; 2.Kf3? Rg2 ! 3.gxh7 (3.Rxh7+ Kg1 4.Ra7 Rxg6 5.Rxa4=) 3...Rg7 4.Kf4 a3 5.Kf5 a2 6.Ra8 Rxh7 7.Rxa2 Rh3 8.Kxf6 Re3=

2...Rd1+

Playing the Rook to g2 would now be a serious mistake; 2...Rg2? 3.Rxh7+ Kg3 4.g7 Kf3 5.Rh3+ Rg3 6.Rxg3+ and white wins.

3.Ke2 Rg1

The Rook goes behind the dangerous pawn.

4.Rxh7+ Kg3

5.Rh1! ...

This type of sacrifice is often a feature of these endings.The Rook cannot be taken because the g-pawn would queen.

5... Rg2+

6.Ke3! ...

6.Kf1? Rf2+ 7.Ke1 Rg2=

6...Kg4

This is to answer 7.g7 with 7...Kf5! uncovering the Rook attack on the pawn.

7.Rh2! ...

7.Ke4? f5+ 8.Ke5 Kf3 9.Kxf5 Ke3 10.Rh4 c3 11.Rxa4 Kd2 12.Ra2 Kc1 =

7...Rg3+?

Computer analysis indicates that this is not the strongest defence. The computer calculates that Black quickly loses if the Rook is not now accepted. It chooses the Q vs R ending which makes the win technically very difficult;

7...Rxh2! 8.g7 Kf5 9.g8Q Rh4 10.Kf3 Rf4+ (10...a3 11.Qd5+ Kg6 12.Kg3 a2 13.Qa8 a1Q 14.Qxa1 Re4 15.Kf3 f5 16.Qd1 Kf6 17.Qd6+ Kg5 18.Qd8+ Kg6 19.Qd6+ Kg5 20.Qd5+-) 11.Kg3 Rd4 12.Qc8+ Kg6 13.c3 Re4 14.Qg8+ Kf5 15.Qd5+ Re5 16.Qd7+ Kg6 17.Kf4 a3 18.Qa7 Rf5+ 19.Ke4 Re5+ 20.Kd4 Kf5 21.Qxa3+-; Crafty 12.9 UNIX (Valentin Albillo )

7...Rg1 8.Kf2 Rc1 9.g7 Rxc2+ 10.Ke3 Rxh2 11.g8Q+ Kf5 12.Qxc4 Rh5 13.Qxa4 ; This position is a win according to the Thompson CD.

8.Kf2! ...

White is now threatening Rg2! to force an exchange of Rooks.

8.Ke4? f5+ 9.Ke5 Kf3 10.Kxf5 c3 11.Kf6 a3 12.g7 a2 13.Rh1 Ke2 14.Ra1 Kd2 15.Rxa2 Kc1 16.Ra8 Rxg7 17.Kxg7 Kxc2=

8...Rf3+

9.Kg1 Rg3+

9...Re3? 10.g7 Re8 11.g8Q+ Rxg8 12.Rg2++-

10.Rg2 Rxg2+

11.Kxg2 a3

12.g7 a2

13.g8Q+

White wins. The check is very useful and makes all the difference.

A brilliant end by Selesniev. I can now see why Lasker loved his studies. It is a mental challenge to understand all the subtlety of this study. I don't think we can be too hard on the composer for "missing" 7...Rxh2! prolonging the defence.


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES 

04/10/98

Position 57

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Hooper

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