PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.18/10/98


Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo of Spain
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Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 60

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:kn3n2/8/1p1K4/1P5R/8/8/8/8: 


  LAST WEEK, POSITION 59

David Janowski (1868-1927) was a Polish born player of Grandmaster strength who settled in Paris in his early 20's. He was renowned for his attacking ability. He won many brilliancy prizes but he didn't have the patience for long endings. He once said, "I detest the endgame. A well-played game should be practically decided in the middlegame." It is not surprising then that with this attitude he was no match for the really great players like Capablanca and Emanuel Lasker.

Janowski v Ed. Lasker 

New York, 1924

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION :8/3q4/5P2/4P1N1/pk1P1K2/1p6/1P1N4/8:

 Just so there is no confusion, Edward Lasker was the player of the Black pieces not Emanuel Lasker, the former World Champion who won the New York tournament. Alekhine wrote in the Tournament Book: "without doubt this is the oddest game of the tournament!"

1.f7! Qe7

2.d5 a3

Black counter attacks by creating his own passed pawn.

3.bxa3+ Kc3

Crafty 12.9 UNIX (Valentin Albillo ) chose 3...Kxa3 4.d6 Qf8 5.Kf5 Ka2 6.Kg6 b2 7.d7 Qe7 8.f8Q Qxf8 9.Nf7 b1Q+ 10.Nxb1 Qb4 11.d8Q Qe4+ 12.Kg7 Kxb1 and White wins with the e-pawn. 3....Kc3 was the computers second choice with still a high +evaluation for White.

4.d6 Qf8

The Queen is a pitiful sight. She is never at her best when defending.

5.Nge4+ ...

Crafty preferred the other Knight check. 5.Nde4+ Kd3 6.e6 b2 7.e7 Qb8 8.f8Q b1Q 9.e8Q Qc1+ A fantastic position with the 4 Queens on the board but White can escape the checks. 10.Kg4 Qg1+ 11.Kh4 Qe1+ 12.Kh5 Qe2+ 13.Kg6 Qb6 14.Qf3++-

5... Kd3

6.e6 Qh6+

7.Kf5 b2

Credit has to be given to Lasker for fighting on in a desperate situation.

8.d7 Qf8

9.a4 ...

Now Janowski throws his a-pawn into the battle and is threatening to march it all the way home.

9...Qa8

10.e7...

A remarkable position. Lasker descibed the pawns as termites which nothing could stop.

10...Qd5+

10...Qxe4+ is hopeless: 11.Nxe4 b1Q 12.d8Q++-

11.Kf6 Qd4+

Now we come to the fateful moment in this ending. Janowski had played brilliantly up to now but Lasker with this check gives him a difficult choice. He played 12.Ke6?? which throws away the win because now Black can reach a theoretical drawn ending. Play continued as follows: 12...b1Q 13.Nxb1 (13.d8Q Qa2+ 14.Kf5 Qxf7+ 15.Kg4 Qg6+ and Black has a perpetual.) 13...Qxe4+ 14.Kf6 Qh4+ and the game is a draw because Black captures the a-pawn as follows; 15.Kg7 (If the King goes to 15.Ke6 Black has a perpetual with 15...Qe4+ 16.Kd6 Qd4+ 17.Kc7 Qa7+= ) 15...Qxe7 16.d8Q+ Qxd8 18.f8Q Qd7+ 19.Kg8 Qxa4= Drawn according to the Thompson CD.

He should have played:

12.Kg6! b1Q

13.d8Q! Qbg1+

14.Ng5 ...

White wins as Black has no more checks.

A remarkable ending but spoilt by Janowski's error which was probably due to fatigue.


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES
 

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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