PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 25/10/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 61

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/K5p1/1p5k/1P5p/P1n5/5N2/8/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 60

Mark Liburkin (1910-53), a Soviet study composer, followed in the footsteps of Troitsky, Kubbel and the Platov brothers. His early death robbed the world of a truly great composer who showed purity, economy and originality in his endgame compositions.

Liburkin, 1934

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:kn3n2/8/1p1K4/1P5R/8/8/8/8:

This study takes its idea from an ending that occured in a quickplay game between Capablanca and Lasker in Berlin 20 years earlier. To create the study Liburkin added an extra Knight and gave it some introduction play. The position of these Knights are in stark contrast to the Janowski's Knights we saw last week. All things being equal the Knights should be able to draw against the Rook but here they are placed in a diabolical position. They do not enjoy being placed on the edge of the board. Knights on the rim are indeed grim.

1.Rh8! Nfd7

1...Ng6? 2.Rg8 Nf4 3.Rf8 Ng6 4.Rf7+-

2.Kc7 Ka7

No choice here, other moves lead to Black being mated.

3.Re8 ...

3.Rd8? Nc5! 4.Rxb8 Ne6+ 5.Kc8 Nc5=.White can never free his Rook.

3.Rh1? Nc5! 4.Ra1+ Nca6+ 5.bxa6 b5!=

3... Nf6!

3...Nc5? looses because of 4.Re7 Nd3 5.Kc8+ Ka8 6.Rb7 Nc5 7.Rxb6 Nbd7 8.Rc6 Ka7 9.Kc7 Ka8 10.Rd6 Ka7 11.Rh6 Ka8 12.Rh3+-

4.Rxb8 Ne8+

4...Nd5+? 5.Kc8 Ne7+ 6.Kd7 Kxb8 7.Kxe7 and White wins the King and pawn ending.

5.Kd7 ...

5.Kc8? Nd6+ 6.Kc7 Nxb5+ =

5...Nc7!

5...Kxb8? 6.Kxe8 and again the King and pawn ending is lost for Black. This is now the position that occurred in the Capablanca v Lasker game mentioned earlier. How can White prevent the loss of the b-pawn? He finds a remarkable move which puts this ending on another planet!

6.Ra8+! ...

The only move that wins.

6...Nxa8

Other moves end with the same result: 6...Kb7 2.Ra7+ wins. 6...Kxa8 7.Kxc7 Ka7 8.Kc6+-

7.Kc8 Nc7

8.Kxc7 Ka8

9.Kxb6

and White Wins.

A practical ending was the inspiration of this study. Capablanca's play in the endgame phase is probably the finest example that any composer or player can imitate. In the endings he had a compulsion for simplicity and clarity which here Liburkin emulates in a study setting with some success.

Philip Dahan-Bouchard's painting of the Saavedra Study has been sold. It really is a sensation and he is planning to paint more pictures with a chess problem theme which is great news!!

 

 


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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