PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 1/11/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 62

White to Play & DRAW 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:k7/1K6/2p3p1/2rp1P2/pp6/7p/5K1P/4R3: 

 
LAST WEEK, POSITION 61

Laszlo Szabo (1917-1998), the Hungarian Grandmaster survived the horrors of forced labour service and imprisonment in the Second World War to become one of the strongest non-Soviet players of the post-war period. He played in three Candidate tournaments and it was at Amsterdam, 1956 that he came close to the world championship: he came equal third with a group of Soviet grandmasters just behind Smyslov and Keres.

Szabo v Groszpeter

Budapest, 1984

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/K5p1/1p5k/1P5p/P1n5/5N2/8/8:

The b-pawn, guarded by the Knight, is very important to Blacks Queenside defence. How is the Knight to be enticed away?

1.Nd2! ...

Total commitment. There is no going back. This sacifice is based on precise calculation and understanding the finesse involved in this type of ending.

1... Nxd2

2.a5 bxa5

Other moves are no better . 3...h4? 3.axb6 h3 4.b7 h2 5.b8Q h1Q and white has the winning skewer 6.Qh8+. Analysis always has to go beyond the promotion stage for just an eventuality. 2...Nc4? 3.a6 h4 4.Kb8 h3 5.a7 h2 6.a8Q+-

3.b6 ...

Black now tries to stop the pawn with his Knight.

3... Nc4

4.b7 Ne5

If the Knight could go to a5 then it could stop the White pawn but ironically his own pawn is in the way.

5.Kb8!! ...

This is an important finesse and without it White could not win. 5.Kb6? Nd7+ 6.Kc6 Nb8+ 7.Kc7 a4! 8.Kxb8 a3 9.Kc7 a2 10.b8Q a1Q and Black is winning.

5...Nc6+

The idea of sacrificing the Knight on b8 by playing 5...Nd7+? 6.Kc7 Nb8 7.Kxb8 and then trying to promote the a-pawn doesn't work because Black is out by one tempo.

6.Kc7 Nb4

7.Kb6 Nd5+

8.Kxa5 ...

The King has played an heroic role.

8... Ne7

9.Kb5 ...

and White wins. 

After White's 3.b6 the ending became a Knight verses a single pawn. The question is; can the Knight stop the pawn by holding or blockading the pawn or by threatening a fork against the pawn and then sacrificing the Knight for the pawn? None of these defensive ideas were available for Black partly because his own pawn took away an important square. 

These endings are not trivial when you consider that Bronstein in his 6th game of the 1951 World Championship match (3N4/1p6/8/p7/2P2k2/1KP1p3/8/8 w ) made a blunder ( 57.Kc2??) that had serious implications for the final match result. Probably thinking he could still get his Knight back in time to stop the passed pawn he overlooked an important finesse by Botvinnik's King (57...Kg3!) which mean't his e-pawn promotes.

I scanned in a print of Philip Dahan-Bouchard's painting of the Saavedra Study rather late last week so some of you may have missed it. I have decided to keep it here another week. It has been sold to a private collector. It took over a year to paint! and it measures 6'x 4'. A small print like this cannot do justice to the original which has tremendous detail and creates quite an impression.

 


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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