PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 15/11/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 64

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/b1p3p1/Bk6/4N3/8/8/8/N5K1:  
LAST WEEK, POSITION 63

Jose Capablanca (1888-1942) the third World Champion: When he was a child he was taken to the Havana Chess Club to see how he would fair against some of Cuba's strongest players. He made rapid progress and was soon good enough to challenge Jaun Corzo to a match for the Club Championship. (Some authorities say this was the Cuban Championship but this took place some months later and was won by Jaun Corzo.) The match was to consist of seven games with draws not counting. He got off to a bad start losing the first two games but gradually Capa gained his confidence and he eventually won the closely fought match (+4-3=6). The 11th game contained a Queen sacrifice followed by an accurately played endgame. It is without doubt one of the most remarkable games ever played by a prodigy and it pointed to a brilliant future for the young Cuban.

J. Capablanca v J. Corzo

Match, 1901

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:r5rk/pp3n1p/4P3/1q3pp1/3P4/PP3N1P/1B5K/4RR2:

I wonder if you have seen this position before? It comes from a famous game which at the time caused a sensation. Capablanca has just sacrificed his Queen on b5. The idea was not to checkmate his opponent but to reach a won ending.

How does he continue?

1.d5+! ...

1.exf7? is no good because of 1...Qxb3!

1... Rg7

2.exf7 h6

2...Rf8 may have been better but white is still winning. 3.Nd4 Qxd5 4.Re8 Qxf7 5.Rxf8+ Qxf8 6.Nxf5+-;

2...Qxd5 3.Re8+ Rxe8 4.fxe8Q+ and Black is soon mated.

3.Nd4 Qxf1

Black has to take the Rook otherwise Whites attack is overwhelming.

3...Qd7? is no good because of: 4.Nxf5 Qxf7 5.Bxg7+ Kh7 6.Re6+-

4.Rxf1 Rxf7

5.Rxf5 Rxf5

6.Nxf5+ Kh7

7.Ne7! ...

The King is cut off from the centre. The ending is lost for Corzo but he plays on hoping that his young inexperienced opponent will make a mistake. The ending is not without interest as Corzo sets a number of traps which Capablanca manages to navigate with ease.

7...Rf8 8.Kg2 h5 9.d6 g4 10.hxg4 hxg4 11.Be5! (The Bishop is heading for c7) 11...Kh6 12.d7 Rd8 13.Ng8+! Rxg8 14.Bc7 Kg6 15.d8Q Rxd8 16.Bxd8 b5 (Whites winning plan is to attack the Queenside pawns with his King while the Bishop looks after the passed g-pawn.) 17.Kf2 Kf5 18.Ke3 Ke5 19.Kd3 Kd5 20.Kc3 g3 21.Bh4 g2 22.Bf2 a5 23.b4 Ke4 (White cannot take the a-pawn because his Bishop doesn't control the queening square at a8) 24.Bb6! Kd5 25.Kd3 Kc6 26.Bg1 Kd5 27.Bh2 Kc6 28.Kd4 a4 29.Ke5 Kb6 (Corzo has one last trick up his sleeve. He plays to set up a stalemate trap.) 30.Kd6 Ka6 31.Kc5! ( Not 31.Kc6? because of 31...g1Q 32.Bxg1=) Black Resigns.

Capablanca said: "Considering my age and little experience this game is quite remarkable, even the endgame was very well played by me"

A few months later Capablanca had a "setback" in his early chess career when he could only come 4th, behind the Corzo brothers and Fernandez, in the Cuban Championship of 1902. Interestingly his headmaster, A. Fiol was playing in the tournament and I have often wondered what influence he had on the young player. I have a vision of this boy and his headmaster, who was a strong player, playing many friendly games in the breaks of the school day as they prepared for the various chess matches. Is Fiol the forgotten influence who helped shape the chess career of the Cuban genius? 


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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