PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 22/11/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 65

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:7r/B5bp/1R2pp2/3k2p1/P7/2P2P2/5P1P/3K4:

 
LAST WEEK, POSITION 64

E. Ratner composed this study in Paris in 1926. It was a particular favourite of Emanuel Laskers and it was first published in his own Manual in 1932. Ratner doesn't seemed to have composed many studies and after a long search I have been unable to find out anymore details about him.

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/b1p3p1/Bk6/4N3/8/8/8/N5K1:  

Black has another threat besides the obvious attack against the Bishop: When Black moves his King, giving discovered check, the Bishop can fork the two Knights at d4 winning one of them and then it seems like a draw; but White has a surprise.

1.Be2!! ...

This is the best square for the Bishop. Other moves throw away the win:

1.Bd3? here the Bishop will be vulnerable to attack. Kb7+ 2.Kg2 Bd4 3.Nb3 Bxe5 4.Na5+ Kb6! In the endgame the King becomes a powerful piece and must be activated. 5.Nc4+ Kc5 6.Nxe5 Kd4= A rare double attack by the King;

1.Bf1? A passive position for the Bishop. Kb7+ 2.Kg2 Bd4 3.Nb3 Bxe5 4.Na5+ Kc8! 5.Ba6+ Kd7= In the main line this escape is not available because of the threatened Bishop check at g4.

1...Kb7+

1...Ka5+? 2.Kg2 Bd4 3.Nb3++-

2.Kg2! ...

This is the only correct King move to win. If he went to h2 it would be in check when the Knight is taken at e5. If the King went to h1 or f1 Black could get his pawn to g3 and this would tie up the King and the winning idea could not be carried out.

2... Bd4

3.Nb3 Bxe5

4.Na5+ Ka8

This is the only move. All the other squares are mined to winning checks. Whites aim is now to tie the King down.

5.Nc6 ...

The King is completely tied up. Can you see the winning idea?

5... Bd6

6.Ba6 g5

7.Kf3! ...

Yes, the King marches to c8 to support Bb7 mate.

7...Bf8

8.Kg4 Bc5

9.Kf5 ...

Black is lost. He cannot stop the King's march and the threatened mate.

This study made a deep impression on Lasker. He was pleased with the utilisation of the power of the pieces and the subtle winning procedure. Of all the world champions it seems that Lasker is the one that is nearest to this art form although he is closely followed by Botvinnik and Smyslov. All three composed studies of merit but I have this feeling that the study meant more to Lasker than the others. To him the aesthetic side of chess manifested itself in the achievement of the chesspieces. In an important section in his Manual he writes eloquently about this: "It is the achievement of the pieces on the chess-board, nothing else, that grips the interest of the spectator and carries him along and excites him." In this study it was the achievement of the small White army which so impressed him and made it one of his favourites.

We are now into the run up to the start of the millennium competition. If you are thinking of entering perhaps you could send me an e-mail to that effect. It only needs to be a single line. This will give me some idea of the number of entries I may be getting. Thanks for your cooperation. If you just want to enjoy trying to solve the positions rather than taking part in the competition then that is fine by me. Best Wishes. Brian.

mailto: brigosling@aol.com


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

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Hooper

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mailto: brigosling@aol.com