PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 29/11/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100 (= 2/2000 exchange rates)

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. Start with the Christmas event; details below. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 66

White to Play & DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:5K2/k7/4P1p1/8/8/8/4b3/8:
  LAST WEEK, POSITION 65

Early in 1957 the 14-year-old Bobby Fischer played a short exhibition match of two games with Dr Max Euwe, a former World Champion. The idea was to introduce the wonderkid to the wider chess world. Fischer lost the match but was able to draw one of the games. The final occasion they played each other was at the Leipzig Olympiad in 1960. By this time Bobby's international career had taken off and he was already a veteran of a passed Candidates Tournament.

Fischer v Euwe

Leipzig, 1960

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:7r/B5bp/1R2pp2/3k2p1/P7/2P2P2/5P1P/3K4:

 A few months before this game was played, GM Pal Benko who was soon to become a member of the United States team pointed out to Fischer an opening innovation on the White side of the Panov-Botvinnik attack. Fischer played the new move in this game and although it meant White would have a terrible pawn structure he had real chances because Black would have difficulty developing his Kingside. The above position occured soon after the innovation was played.

Black was forced to give up his a-pawn to stay alive but now he is faced with White's  dangerous pawn. Passed pawns increase in value as they march up the board. Strategically they are a great asset because they not only threaten to promote but they also tie up the enemy pieces.

1.a5! ...

This is the most direct way to win.

1... f5

This move frees the Bishop. Moves with the Rook seem no better. 1...Ra8 2.Rb7 Bf8 3.Rxh7+-; 1...Rc8 2.a6 Rxc3 3.Rb7 Bf8 4.Be3 Ra3 (4...Bc5? 5.Rb5+-) 5.a7+-

2.Bb8! Rc8

2...Be5 is no better after 3.Bxe5 Kxe5 4.a6 Ra8 5.Kc2+-

3.a6 Rxc3

4.Rb5+ Kc4?

After the game Euwe showed a trap he could have set: 4...Kc6!? 5.Ra5 Bd4 6.Be5? This move throws away the win because of: 6...Rc5 7.Rxc5+ Bxc5=. Fischer suggested 6.Ke2 as an improvement: 6...Rc2+ 7.Kd3 Bb6 8.a7 Rd2+ 9.Kc4 Rc2+ 10.Kb3 Rc3+ 11.Kb2 Bxa7 12.Bxa7 Rxf3 ( Fritz5) but technically it is still a difficult win.

5.Rb7 Bd4

6.Rc7+ Kd3

7.Rxc3+ Kxc3

Can you see the winning move?

8.Be5!! ...

The passed pawn cannot be stopped. Black Resigns.

In this game Fischer shows his great strength. He is armed with the latest opening innovation which in this case makes it possible for him to reach a favourable ending. He is excellent with the Rook + Bishop pieces where he has a slight edge. He showed in a number of his 1971 Candidates' matches his superb technique in this type of ending especially when playing against a Rook + Knight combination. 

We are now into the run up to the start of the millennium competition. If you are thinking of entering perhaps you could send me an e-mail to that effect. It only needs to be a single line. This will give me some idea of the number of entries I may be getting. Thanks for your cooperation. If you just want to enjoy trying to solve the positions rather than taking part in the competition then that is fine by me. Best Wishes. Brian.

mailto: brigosling@aol.com


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Starting Sunday 6th December.

Closing Date January 10th 1999.

Rules will be the same as for the Summer Competition.

Click here >> see Rules and have a go at this recent event.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

Solutions and name of the Winner.

Click here >> SUMMER 98
ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS

mailto: brigosling@aol.com