PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 5/12/98
Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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THIS WEEK

POSITION 67 

Black to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/4kp2/p7/7Q/1P4p1/3q2PP/8/3K4: 


  LAST WEEK, POSITION 66

Richard Reti (1889-1929) Czechoslovakian Grandmaster, theoretician and endgame composer. He pondered long and hard before deciding to become a professional player. He needn't have worried. After a poor start he became a leading player in the post war period and had a number of successes which included a first at Gothenburg in 1920. In 1924 at the New York tournament he achieved a great win over Capablanca, the first loss the World Champion had suffered in 8 years. Significant as this was, Reti is chiefly remembered for his contribution to the HYPERMODERN MOVEMENT and his book Modern Ideas in Chess (1923). It deals with the development and history of chess strategy up to the time of hypermodern play and has since become a classic. Reti regarded chess as an art and it is not surprising that he composed a number of chess endgame studies which are regarded as immortal works of art. 

 Reti, 1928

White to Play & DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:5K2/k7/4P1p1/8/8/8/4b3/8:

White's situation is desperate. How can he stop Black's g-pawn?

 He must counter -attack.

1.Ke7! ...

Ironically his own King gets in the way of his passed pawn.

1... g5

2.Kd6! g4

3.e7! ...

He must push this pawn now, while the other Bishop diagonal is blocked by the g-pawn.The Bishop has no choice but to play too:

3...Bb5

4.Kc5! ...

Now we see why White manoeuvred his King here. This is a double attack: (a) Besides attacking the Bishop the King is also threatening (b) to enter into the square of the pawn. Black cannot meet both threats.

4...Bd7

5.Kd4!...

The king is in square of the pawn so it can be stopped. The game is drawn.

5...Kb6

6.Ke4 Kc5

7.Kf4 Kd6

White now draws off the defending Bishop by Queening his own pawn.

8.e8Q! Bxe8

9.Kxg4 ...

Drawn

Reti has shown in a number of his studies that because of the geometry of the chessboard the shortest distance between two points is not always a straight line.

Harry Golombek has written a beautiful book on Reti. Reti's Best Games of Chess (1954). It contains 70 games plus 15 studies published by DOVER.


ARCHIVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

04/10/98

Position 57

Keres

27/9/98

Position 56

Kubbel

20/9/98

Position 55

Bronstein

13/9/98

Position 54

M. Platov

06/9/98

Position 53

Marshall

30/8/98

Position 52

Troitzky

23/8/98

Position 51

Sir. G. Thomas

16/8/98

Position 50

Mackenzie

09/8/98

Position 49

Chigorin

02/8/98

Position 48

Zalkind

26/7/98

Position 47

Alekhine

19/7/98

Position 46

Bahr

04/7/98

Position 45

Fine

28/6/98

Position 44

Checkover

21/6/98

Position 43

Dus-Chotimirsky

14/6/98

Position 42

Kasparyan

07/6/98

Position 41

Reshevsky

01/6/98

Position 40

Korn

24/5/98

Position 39

Rubinstein

17/5/98

Position 38

Hooper

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