PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 20/12/98

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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THIS WEEK

POSITION 69

White to Play & WIN

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1k6/4p1p1/1P3p2/P1K1pP2/2B3P1/5b2/8:   


POSITION 68

David Przepiorka (1880-1942?) was a Polish master and composer who was active in the first part of this century. His best result was when he came 1st at Munich in 1926 ahead of Bogoljubow and Spielmann. He played in two Olympiads, Hamburg 1930 and Prague in 1931. In 1942 he was arrested by German soldiers, while attending a meeting of the Warsaw chess circle. He died soon afterwards in a concentration camp. Fred Reinfeld, the famous American writer dedicated his book, The Unknown Alekhine to his memory and to other chess masters who died in the Holocaust.

D Przepiorka, 1930

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:2N1k3/4p3/3pKp2/5p2/4NB2/pp6/8/8: 

Black's pawns are dangerous so White has to counterattack quickly. He hasn't got time to stop the pawns directly so he has to go for the monarch who doesn't look safe on the back rank. There is only one move that wins:

1.Nexd6+!...

1.Ncxd6+? exd6 2.Nxd6+ Kf8 3.Bh6+ Kg8 4.Ne8 Kh7! (The only move to avoid being mated in the corner; If 4...a2 5.Nf6 Kh8 6.Kf7 a1Q 7.Bg7#) 5.Bf8 a2 6.Kf7 a1Q 7.Nxf6+ Qxf6+ 8.Kxf6 b2 and white is lost.

1.Bxd6? exd6 (Not 1...fxe4?? 2.Bxe7 f5 3.Nd6#) 2.Nxf6+ Kd8-+ the King is not in danger and Black will Queen a pawn.

1.Nxf6+? exf6 2.Bxd6 Kd8 3.Na7 a2 4.Be7+ Kc7 5.Bxf6 f4! and black has a draw.

1... exd6

1...Kf8 2.Nxe7 Kg7 3.Ne8+ and Black is in a mating net. I will leave you to work out the variations.

1...Kd8 2.Nxe7 a2 3.Nb7+ Ke8 4.Be3 f4 (4...a1Q 5.Nd6+ Kd8 6.Bb6#) 5.Bd4+-

2.Bh6!! ...

2.Bxd6? Kd8; This is the only move. If a pawn moves then white mates with Be7 and Nd6#. 3.Na7 a2! 4.Be7+ Kc7 5.Bxf6 f4! 6.Nb5+ Kb6 7.Nd6 Kc5 8.Ne4+ Kb4 9.Nf2 Kc4 10.Kf5 f3 11.Ke4 b2 12.Bxb2 Kb3=

2.Nxd6+? Kf8! (2...Kd8? white now wins; 3.Be3 Kc7 4.Nb5+ Kc6 5.Nxa3+-) 3.Bh6+ Kg8 4.Ne8 Kh7! 5.Bf8 a2 6.Kf7 a1Q+-; Black queens just in time.

2... b2

2...a2 3.Nxd6+ Kd8 4.Be3 Kc7 5.Bd4 f4 6.Bxf6 f3 7.Ne4 Kc6 8.Bb2 Kb5 9.Kd5 Kb4 10.Kd4; and White wins.

3.Nxd6+ Kd8

4.Bd2! ...

The Bishop threatens mate at a5 so Black has only the following reply.

4... Kc7

5.Nb5+ Kc6

6.Nxa3 ...

The Knight gets back just in time to stop the b-pawn from queening. The pawns will fall and White mates with the Bishop and Knight. In endgame studies these theoretical endings are never played out to the final mate. It would make the solution too long and unwieldy. This pawnless ending is not trivial and even a strong player may have difficulty if he doesn't know the basic positions. It often comes up in practical play and in a quick-play finish it may be difficult to work out OTB in the time available. Practice driving the King to the edge of the board and then to the correct corner, which is the same colour as the Bishop. A chess program is ideal for this type of training.

On May 9th 1936, Capablanca on his way to Moscow, met Przepiorka and gave him a signed copy of his Primer of Chess. Later Przepiorka gave this book to a friend, Josepth Kartasinski who was present when it was autographed. This book was going to save his life. During the German invasion of Poland, Kartasinski was seriously wounded but a German soldier who was a chessplayer, noticed the book, spared his life and helped him to get well.

 The Seasons Greetings to you all.

Gens Una Sumas.
ARCHIVES

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Position 67 

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Hooper

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