PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 3/1/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.
Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Click here >> positions Have a go !!

  Only B > grades will be published so no need to feel embarrassed about the result.

Closing date 17th January 1999

SOLUTIONS + WINNERS will be published on 24th January
THIS WEEK

POSITION 71

Black to Play & DRAW

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/5k2/2R5/p4p2/r6P/5KP1/2P5/8:

 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 70

    Nicolas Rossolimo ( 1910-1975 ) International Grandmaster, He composed the following beautiful study at 18 years before leaving the Ukraine for France in 1929. His best performances as a player came after the Second World War when he won a number of fine tournaments: 1st at Hastings 1948/49, Southsea 1949, Gijon in 1950, Beverwijk in 1953. In this period he drew two matches with Tartakower. In 1953 he emigrated to the United States and played for them in the Olympiads of 1958, 1960, and 1966.

Rossolimo, 1928 

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:2k5/6R1/N7/8/8/6K1/7p/5b2:   

Black is threatening to queen the h-pawn and to win the Knight. It is not easy to cope with this double attack.White somehow has to find time to take the pawn at h2 and still retain a winning position.

1.Rg8+!...

[If 1.Kxh2? Bxa6=; 1.Rc7+? Kd8 and the threat still exist.]

1... Kb7

[1...Kd7? 2.Nc5+ Kc6 (2...Kd6 3.Ne4+ Kd5 4.Nf6+ Ke6 5.Kxh2 Kxf6 6.Rf8+) 3.Rc8+ The Knight is now protected so White can capture the pawn next move.]

2.Nc5+ Kb6!

Black's best chance is to stay close to the Knight.

3.Na4+ Kb5

4.Nc3+ ...

[4.Kxh2? Kxa4=]

4... Kb4

5.Na2+ Kb3

6.Nc1+ Kb2

The King can now safely take the pawn.

7.Kxh2! Kxc1

8.Rg1 ...

The Bishop is pinned so White wins.

The Rook vs Bishop ending (without the pawn) indicated in the side variations was always drawn because White's King was just too far away to help confine the enemy King to the edge of the board where a win would have been possible. Blacks King had time to retreat to the safe corner which is the corner of the opposite colour of the Bishop.


There have been a number of interesting endings at the Hastings Tournament which closes on the 10th JANUARY. www.bcf.ndirect.co.uk/hastings/

Rd 1. Ponomariov vs Plaskett; The ending R v NB plus pawns on the same side of board should probably have been drawn. This ending is of some theoretical interest.

Rd 4. Speelman vs Miles; Although White had a passer his King was exposed to attack and a draw seems a fair result. Ponomariov vs Fressinet; Ponomariov drew a difficult B vs N ending a pawn down. Sadler vs Emms; Black, a pawn minus, showed his endgame skill in drawing a R + p ending. 


I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings we deal with here. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have databases.(Chessbase Endgame CD) In the days when we had ajournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter are both good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941) and the more modern Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are really about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which has been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked". Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972). Revised as The Chess Endgame Study (1981).  

 The Seasons Greetings to you all.

Gens Una Sumas.


ARCHIVES

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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