PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 24/1/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A
(See later)


THIS WEEK

POSITION 74 

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/8/7B/8/K7/3B3p/5kp1/6Rb: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 73

Savielly Tartakower (1887-1956) was a fine player and a great chess writer. He enjoyed paradoxes and witty epigrams, many of which later became famous. He achieved reasonable chess results but had a weakness for experimenting with bizarre openings. Though he was born in Russia he lived most of his later life in Paris. He played for Poland in the 30's and was champion of that country in 1935 and 1937. It was when playing for Poland against France in the 1933 Olympiad at Folkestone that he reached the following position against the world champion, Alekhine.

  Alekhine v Tartakower

Back to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:3r2k1/8/p2P2pp/2r2p2/1pR1pPn1/1P4P1/P5P1/1B1R2K1: 

Consider the situation of the minor pieces: the Bishop is shut in and has no real future whereas the Knight has freedom and will now destroy Whites position.

1... Ne3!!

Here begins one of the great Knight manoeuvres in the history of the game. Not 1...Rxc4? because of 2.bxc4 Kf7 3.c5 and it is Black who is under presssure

2.Rxc5 Nxd1

3.Rc6 Nc3

4.Bc2 Ne2+

5.Kf2 Nd4

White will now lose his precious d-pawn.

6.Rc5 Rxd6

The game was now adjourned. Word quickly spread around the beautiful Leas Cliffe Hotel, with its fine terraces overlooking the English Channel, that the world champion was in a losing position.

7.g4 ...

White has to exchange as many pawns as possible to incease his drawing chances.

7...Nxc2

This is the move that Tartakower says was more precise; to bring about a won Rook and pawn ending. In the game Black played 7...Kg7!? and now White sacrificed his Bishop in the hope of having drawing chances: 8.gxf5 gxf5 9.Bxe4!? fxe4 10.Ke3 Nc6 11.Kxe4 Kf6 and Alekhine played on for another 30 moves in a lost cause.

8.Rxc2 Kf7

9.gxf5 gxf5

10.g4 Kf6  

11.Rc4 a5 12.Rc5 fxg4 13.Rxa5 Rd3

The f-pawn will fall and with it the game.

  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. David Rowe of England is second with grade B+

 

 

Click here >> Solutions 

CONGRATULATIONS TO PATRICK AND DAVID

Next competition starts: 14th March


ARCHIVES

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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