PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 7/2/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo of Spain.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 76

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:5n2/p1p1p1b1/1pPpPkNp/1P1P2pP/3K2P1/8/5B2/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 75

Frederic Yates (1884 -1932) was a professional player at a time when English chess was at a low ebb. He kept the torch burning winning the British championship six times and he gained a reputation as a giant killer in international tournaments; he defeated Alekhine on two occassions and Bogoljubow three times. His victory over Alekhine at Carlsbad in 1923 was very memorable and possibly one of the greatest games ever played by an Englishman in the first half of this century. He died in tragic circumstances, as a result of a defective gas pipe connection in his bedroom. 

Yates v Marshall

Carlsbad, 1929

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:6Q1/8/8/3K4/p7/8/kp3P2/8: 

The winning idea is for White to exchange his Queen for the pawns, and win with the f-pawn. We will follow the game continuation until Yates loses his way and can only draw this ending !!

The help of the King is needed in the fight against the pawns.

 1.Kd4+ Ka3!

[1...Ka1? 2.Qa8! b1Q 3.Qxa4 Kb2 4.Qb4+ and now the Queens are exchanged and White wins with the f-pawn. This idea is echoed in a number of the variations that follow.]

2.Qf8+...

[2.Qg6? b1Q 3.Qxb1=]

2...Kb3

[2...Ka2 may be slightly better but Black is clearly lost, now many roads lead to Rome: 3.Qb4 (3.Qe8 a3 4.Qf7+ Ka1 5.Qb3+-; 3.Qf7+ Ka3 4.Qe7+ Kb3 5.Qh7 Ka2 6.Qc2+-; 3.Qa8 Ka3 4.Qf3+ Ka2 5.Qd5+ Ka3 6.Qc5+ Ka2 7.Qc2+-) 3...a3 ( Crafty 12.7 Unix, no tablebases, chooses: 3...b1Q 4.Qxa4+ Kb2 5.Qb5+ and an easy win for White.Valentin Albillo) 4.Qc4+ Ka1 5.Qb3 a2 6.Qc3 Kb1 7.Qe1+ Kc2 8.Qe2+ Kb3 9.Qc4+ Ka3 10.Qc3+ wins]

3.Qf3+ Ka2

4.Qd5+ Ka3

5.Qc5+ Ka2

6.Qc4+? ...

[Yates now starts to lose his way: 6.Qc2! is decisive, 6...Ka3 (the only move) 7.Qb1! and the King is forced away from the pawns with an easy win for White.]

6... Ka3

[The only reasonable move.]

7.Qd3+...

[7.Qc2? b1Q 8.Qxb1=]

7... Ka2

Now he makes a fateful mistake due to fatigue and plays: 8.Kc4?? and the pawn ending is only drawn. 8...b1Q 9.Qxb1+ Kxb1 10.Kb4 Kb2!! ( Several spectators had expected Marshall to resign, they had not seen this move: shades of Reti ) 11.Kxa4 Kc3, the King is in the square of the pawn, 12.f4 Kd4= and he catches it in time. Another Marshall swindle !! He should have played:

8.Qc2! Ka3

[Other moves lead to Black being mated.]

9.Qb1! Kb3

10.Kd3 Wins

[The King is forced away from the pawns with an easy win for White.]

The great Russian endgame composer and analyst, Grigoriev showed that for this ending White can still win even without the f-pawn. He did a lot of research into this class of ending (QvPP) and worked out winning zones for different King positions. This valuable work was found among his papers after his death in 1940: His analysis for the above position minus the f-pawn was: 1.Kc6+ Ka3 2.Qf8+ Ka2 3.Qf7+ Ka3 4.Qe7+ Ka2 5.Qe6+ Ka3 6.Qd6+ Ka2 7.Qd2 Ka3 8.Qc3+ Ka2 9.Qc2 a3 10.Kb5. It is only with the help of the King that White can stop the pawns. Either the enemy King is mated or White transposes into a won ending with QvP,  10...Ka1 11.Qc3 Ka2 12.Ka4 b1Q 13.Qxa3# . 


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. David Rowe of England is second with grade B+

 

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 14th March


ARCHIVES

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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