PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 21/2/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Valentin Albillo of Spain.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 78

White to Play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:R7/8/2r1kp2/P5p1/3KP1Pp/8/8/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 77 

Richard Teichmann (1868-1925) was a German Grandmaster who for many years lived in England. In the early part of the 20th century he was ranked among the top 10 players in the world. He finished 5th so many times in tournaments that he was named Richard the V. His biggest achievement was winning the huge Carlsbad tournament of 1911 from which the following position is taken. Rotlewi, the young Polish player was the other big surprise at Carlsbad. He was playing in his first great master tournament. To the amazement of everyone he defeated  Marshall, Nimzovitch, Schlechter, Spielman, and Tartakower and when this game was played he was in second place, a point behind Teichmann. We join the game at its most critical stage.

Rotlewi vs Teichmann

Carlsbad, 1911

Black to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:2r3k1/p2R2p1/2r4p/q7/1p2N3/nP3P2/PQ4PP/K2R4:

White is threatening mate, Black finds an astonishing reply.

1...Qe5!!

A unique move. Black guards against the threat by offering his own Queen and at the same time threatens mate in two moves starting with 2...Rc8+.

2.Rd8+ ...

White seeks relief through exchanges but not 2.Qxe5?? because of 2...Rc1+ 3.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 4.Kb2 Rb1#.

2... Rxd8!

3.Rxd8+Kh7

4.Rd1 ...

Again not 4.Qxe5?? because of 4...Rc1+ 5.Kb2 Rb1#

4... Qxb2+?

Victory could have been so easy: 4...Nc2+! wins as follows 5.Kb1 Qc7! Black has a very strong attack which will lead to the win of material; 6.a4 Na3+ 7. Ka2 (7.Ka1 Rc2 8.Qd4 Rc1+ 9.Ka2 Qc2+ 10.Qb2 Qxd1-+ Fritz 5.0 ) 7... Rc2 8. Rd2 Rxb2+ 9. Rxb2 Qc1 10. Nd2 Nc2-+ Crafty 12.7 UNIX (Valentin Albillo) But with the move played Black still has a won ending.

5.Kxb2 Rc2+

The King cannot escape from his cage and Black has control of the second rank.

6.Ka1 Rxg2

The White Rook is now forced into a passive position.

7.Rh1 g5

8.Nf6+ Kg7

9.Ne4 Kg6

10.Nd6 a5

White is caught in a clamp and faces a slow end. His one chance is to try and activate the Rook and exchange the Knights but Teichmann does not oblige.

11.Rc1 Rxh2 (Now Black has a powerful passed pawn) 12.Nc4 Nb5 (With the threat of ...Nc6) 13.Ne5+ Kg7 14.Ng4 Re2 15.Rc5 Re1+ 16.Kb2 Na3 (This Knight is a real thorn. The mate threat is at b1.) 17.Rc7+ Kf8 18.Rc1 (The Rook has to come back to guard against the mating threat.)18...Re2+ 19.Ka1 ( Edward Lasker in his account of the game gives here a complicated threefold repetition of the position: "Chess Strategy" (1915, 1934) This was repeated by Jack Spence in his fascinating biography "Richard Teichmann" (1971, 1995) but "The Year Book of Chess" gives no such moves !!) 19...Re6 20.Rh1 Kg7 21.Rc1 Kg6 22.Rc6? (White has had enough of the slow torture. The ending is clearly lost.) 23.Ne5+ Kf5 24.Nxc6 h5 25.Nd4+ Ke5 26.Ne2 Nc2+ 27.Kb2 Nd4 Black wins.

Teichmann now had a clear 2 points lead and was destined for first place. Rotlewi came 4th but sadly he never fulfilled his early promise; he was struck down by a serious illness which meant the end of his international career.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. David Rowe of England is second with grade B+

 

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 14th March


ARCHIVES

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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