PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 28/2/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Mike Fitch and Valentin Albillo.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 79

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:1n6/4k2p/p3ppp1/1pPp4/3P1PP1/3NP3/P3K2P/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 78 

In 1897 Alexi Troitzky(1866-1942) was on the verge of abandoning chess and then a chance meeting with a colleague's son who had with him some chess books changed his mind. He rekindled his former interest in composition and the work of composers. This meeting changed his destiny, for now he is regarded as the greatest exponent of the art of modern endgame study composition. He was one of the first to adapt older themes to modern settings and many of his studies embrace modern strategical concepts. He has over a 1000 studies to his credit. 

A. Troitzky, 1933

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:R7/8/2r1kp2/P5p1/3KP1Pp/8/8/8:  

On the surface this position may appear equal because both sides have passers but White has the advantage because his Rook is able to support his pawn. Black also has to waste valuable time defending against a rear attack which is a feature of these type of endings.

The passed pawn has to be pushed.

1.a6 ...

With the threat of 2.a7, 3.Re8+ and 4.a8Q Black is forced to carry out the following defensive maneuvre with his Rook.

1...Rc7

1...Rd6+ 2.Kc5! Rd7 3.a7 Re7 4.Kb6 Ke5 (4...h3 5.Rh8 Rxa7 6.Kxa7 Ke5 7.Rxh3 Kxe4 8.Ra3 Kf4 9.Ra4+) 5.Rf8 Rxa7 6.Kxa7 Kxe4 7.Rxf6 h3 8.Kb6 h2 9.Rf1 Ke3 (9...h1Q 10.Rxh1 Kf3 11.Rg1) 10.Kc5 Ke2 11.Rh1 Kf3 12.Rxh2 Kxg4 13.Rf2! Kh3 (13...Kg3 14.Rf8) 14.Kd4 g4 15.Ke3 g3 16.Rf8 g2 17.Rg8.

2.a7 ...

Black has to defend against the threatened Rook check which would win immediately.

2... Re7

2...Rd7+ 3.Kc5 Re7 4.Kb6+-

3.e5! ...

This is an important sacrifice because it allows the White Rook to operate along the 6th rank.

3.....fxe5+

3...h3 4.exf6 h2 (4...Rd7+ 5.Kc5) 5.fxe7+- If the h-pawn queens Black is quickly mated.

3... Rd7+ 4.Ke4 Re7 5.exf6 Kxf6+ 6.Kd5 Rf7 7. Kc5 Kg7 8.Rg8+ Kxg8 9.a8=Q+ Kg7 10.Qd8 Kg6 11.Kd6 h3 12.Ke6 Rf3 13.Qg8+ Kh6 14.Qh8+ Kg6 15.Qh5+ Kg7 16.Qxg5+ Kf8 17.Qd5 Rf1 (the Rook falls inevitably) 18.Qd3 Re1+ (else White mates in 10 or less) 19.Kf6 Ke8 20.Qb5+Kd8 21.Qa5+Kd7 22.Qxe1 and wins. Crafty 12.9 UNIX (Valentin Albillo)

4.Ke4 h3

White now wins by sacrificing his passer and then winning the opposite Rook by a skewer. Classical tactics in these type of Rook endings.

5.Rh8 Rxa7

6.Rh6+ Ke7

7.Rh7+ ...

White wins the Rook and the game.

A beautiful ending by Troitzky which is of great practical value. He builds on earlier work of his own and other composers such as Berger, Cheron, Tarrash, Puder, Clausen and V Platov which students of the endgame should know and can be found in most endgame texts. The White Rook at a8 and the pawn at a7 and its mirror positions is a feature which often occurs in Rook endings and knowledge of the analysis will bring positive results. If you are new to the theory of Rook and Pawn endings then this is a good class to start with:(RPa7 v R).The ideas associated with the Rook's pawn are easy to understand and quickly assimilated. Such knowledge will increase your confidence in playing these positions.

Congratulations to Michael Fitch who solved this ending without the aid of his chess program. Hopefully he and others might be encouraged to enter the Easter competition in a few weeks time !!


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. David Rowe of England is second with grade B+

 

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 14th March


ARCHIVES

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Fischer 

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Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

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Position 59

Janowski

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Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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