PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 18/4/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Mike Fitch
THIS WEEK

POSITION 85

Black to Play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/4k3/pp6/2pPb3/P1P1P3/5Kp1/8/1B6:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 84

Dr Ossip Bernstein (1882-1962) belonged to a group of Russian masters who made their home in France after the Revolution. In his early days he had some impressive results in tournaments and was looked upon as a world class grandmaster. In 1903 he came 2nd in the All-Russian Championship at Kiev and in 1907 shared 1st prize with Rubinstein at Ostend. The previous year he obtained a doctorate in law at Heidelberg and gradually Chess took second place to his professional career where he became a successful financial lawyer. Periodically he would make comebacks to Chess but his best years were behind him although he did have a number of excellent results later in life. In 1933 he drew a training match with Alekhine and even in his 70s he played for France in the Amsterdam Olympiad scoring 50%.

Berstein v Zuckerman

Paris, 1929

White to Play & WIN  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/7k/R7/6PP/8/p5K1/8/r7:

The win may look easy with White having the connected passed pawns and the more active Rook but Black has counterchances. White has to show good technique in order to win this difficult ending. He has to be careful that his opponent doesnt blockade the advance of the pawns.

1.Ra7+ Kg8

2.h6! ...

The game continuation was: 2.g6? a2 3.Kg2 Rb1 4.Rxa2 Rb5 5.Ra8+ Kg7 6.Ra7+ Kg8 7.Rh7 This position is of some historical interest. It occurs in Kasparyan's Complete Studies (Dia 073a) Edited byJohn Roycroft (1997) where he quotes Alekhine who annotated the original game."This ending is a win according to theory. Further commmentary is superflous." In fact Kasparyan showed that it was drawn after 7...Rb3! The Rook stays on the 3rd rank unless White pushes his pawn to 8.h6 which only draws after 8..Rb6! In the game Zuckerman played 7...Rg5? and soon lost. From this it follows that 2.h6! is the correct move to win.

2...a2

Black now threatens the winning check at g8 which is easily met by:

3.Kh2!....

3.Kg2? throws away the win after 3... Rb1 4.Rxa2 Rb5! =

3...Rb1

Black has no choice but to give up his a-pawn or he will be defeated in a few moves. Whites passed pawns are too powerful.

4.Rxa2 Rb5

5.Rg2! ...

This is an excellent position for the Rook and indicates the importance of keeping the g2 square vacant on his third move.

5...Kh7

Black is trying to reach a theoretical drawn position with his King blockading the pawns and his Rook at b6

6.g6+! ...

White nips Blacks plan in the bud and now the win should be straight forward.

6...Kg8

7.Rg3 Rh5+

This check doesn't work. Mike Fitch found the earlier moves and now deviates with: 7...Rb6 which is slightly better than the main line; 8.Kh3 Ra6 9.Kh4 Ra4+ 10.Kh5 Ra5+ 11.Rg5 Ra1 12.Rd5 Rh1+ 13.Kg5 Rg1+ 14.Kf5 Rf1+ 15.Ke4 Re1+ 16.Kf3 Rf1+ 17.Ke2 Rf8 18.Rd7 Re8+ 19.Kd3 Ra8 20.Kc4 and White wins.

8.Rh3 Rg5

The winning idea is very beautiful.

9.h7+ Kh8

10.Rg3 Rh5+

11.Kg2 Kg7

12.Rh3 Rg5+

After this forced move Whites King enters the fight and advances to support his passed pawns.

13.Kf3 Rf5+

14.Kg4 Rf8

The defensive idea of transferring the Rook to the back rank doesnt work.

15.Kg5! ...

White prepares the sacrifice of the h-pawn and the resulting exchanges will lead to a won K&P ending.

15...Rd8

16.h8Q+ Rxh8 17.Rxh8 Kxh8 18.Kh6 White wins.

In his long career Bernstein was involved in some interesting endings. Particularly memorable was his draw against Heilman in Berlin 1901 when he was two pawns down. His most famous was his save against Smyslov at Groningen in 1947 who uncharacteristically went to sleep in what was a won R&P ending.

:4R3/8/8/5k2/1p3p2/7r/4K3/8:

Smyslov who was Black played 1...b3. There followed 2. Rb8 b2?? 3.Rxb2! with a draw as the Skewer 4.Rh2+ doesn't work because of 4.Kf3 Rxb2 and it is stalemate.

Next week: Solutions to the Easter Endgame Solving Tournament and Winners names and grades will be published.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. David Rowe of England is second with grade B+

 

 


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