PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 25/4/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

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THIS WEEK

POSITION 86

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/2QK2P1/8/3q4/8/8/1k6/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 85

Mikail Chigorin (1850-1908) was one of the great romantic figures of chess. Towards the latter part of the 19th century he was looked upon as one of the best players in the world. He played two matches against Steinitz for the World Championship. In the first one held in 1889 Steinitz won convincingly but the second match in 1892 was a much closer affair. In the final game Chigorin made a terrible blunder in a won position. If he had scored he would have tied with Steinitz and the match would have been continued until one of the players won 12 games. Chigorin made a tremendous contribution to the cause of chess in Russia and was later looked upon as the "Founder of the Russian School of Chess" He is remembered for his imaginative approach to the opening and middlegame phases and even today his ideas seem fresh and creative. 

Polner vs Chigorin

St Petersburg, 1881

Black to Play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/4k3/pp6/2pPb3/P1P1P3/5Kp1/8/1B6:

In a recent tournament game White had the material advantage of 3 pawns but still could not win because of Bishop of opposite colours. We all have horror stories to tell about these endings and their drawing tendency is well known. It is possible to win these endings but it usually depends on positional features such as having better placed pieces and having the ability to create passed pawns which can be supported by the monarch. In the following ending Chigorin already has a passed pawn but sees his chance to create another on the queenside. His pieces are also better placed. The monarch is free to help with the advanced of the passed pawn whereas White's is tied to the g-pawn. Such positional advantages will give winning chances:

1... b5!

2.axb5 axb5

3.cxb5 c4!

The game continuation was 3...Kd7? which should lead only to a draw 4.Bd3 Kc7 5.Bf1 Kb6 6.Kg2? (6.Ke3! Ka5 7.Kd2 Kb4 8.Kc2 c4 9.Bg2 Kxb5 10.Bf3=) 6...Ka5 7.Kf3 Kb4 8.b6 c4 9.b7 c3 10.Bd3 Kb3 11.Kg2 c2 and Black wins the Bishop and the game.

4.Ba2 c3

This passed pawn is very dangerous and White will have to give up his Bishop in order to stop it. The White King is tied to stopping the g-pawn from queening and cannot help in blockading the c-pawn.

5.Bb1 Kd6

The King heads to the b-file to support the c-pawn.

6.Bd3 Kc5

7.Ke3 Kb4

Black wins

Black easily wins the Bishop for the c-pawn and then promotes the g-pawn. Whites own passed pawns cannot make any progress because Blacks Bishop guards important squares which the pawns would have to transverse in order to promote. In these type of endings it is important to blockade the enemy passed pawns and keep ones own pawns free from such constriction. Chigorin saw he had a won ending because he correctly evaluated these positional features.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 13th JUNE


ARCHIVES

18/4/99

Position 84

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Position 83

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Position 82

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Position 68

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Position 67 

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Position 66 

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Position 65 

Fischer 

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Position 64 

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Position 63 

Capablanca 

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Position 62 

Zepler 

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Position 61 

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Position 59

Janowski

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Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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