PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 2/5/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Mike Fitch
THIS WEEK

POSITION 87 

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:3k2n1/1pb2p1p/p1p2p2/P1P1pN2/1PK1P3/2P3PB/7P/8:   


LAST WEEK, POSITION 86

Ludeck Pachman (1924- ) Czech Grandmaster. Represented his country in all the Olympiads from 1952-1966. A well known author and top theoretician of the opening and middlegame phases of the game. He was arrested and imprisoned for his political activities during the "Prague spring" of 1968. He was later allowed to leave for West Germany and he represented them in the 1976 Olympiad.

Pachman v Gligoric

Moscow, 1947

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/2QK2P1/8/3q4/8/8/1k6/8:

The Pachman-Gligoric game is very famous because it influenced the theory of Q+P v Q endings. For the first time Black adopted the plan of playing his King to the far corner because it was felt at the time he could draw with best play. It was only later that computer analysis generated by databases showed that White had a win even when the King was placed in its optimium defensive position.

The ending was analysed using the Thompson CD-ROM with a Chessbase interface. This contains a database of all the known positions with evaluations of this particular five -man ending. In this type of set up all the legal moves that are possible in the position are displayed on a Chessbase Screen and the optimium move as indicated by the database is played on to the Chessbase analysis board. In this way it is possible to arrive at best play for this particular ending. Please don't be put off by the long solution as some of the ideas are very important and easily transferred to analogous positions in practical play.

1.Kc8 Qg8+

2.Kb7 Qd5+

Pachman thought this move was a mistake and gave it a "? ." He was under the impression that 2...Ka2 draws but the database indicates otherwise.

3.Ka6 Qa2+

If 3...Qg8 then 4.Qe5 is also winning ( Mike Fitch )

4.Qa5 Qg8

White now has the opportunity to find a good square for the Queen.

5.Qd2+...

The game continuation was as follows: 5.Qe5+ Kb1 6.Kb6 Qd8+ 7.Kb5 (7.Qc7 was better) 7...Qd7+ 8.Kb4? (8.Kb6! makes the win much quicker 8...Qd8+ 9.Qc7 Qd4+) 8...Qb7+ 9.Kc4 Qc6+ 10.Qc5! Qe4+ 11.Qd4 Qc6+ 12.Kb3 Pachman thought this move only drew. 12...Qf3+ 13.Ka4 Qa8+ 14.Kb4 Qb7+ 15.Kc3 Qc6+ 16.Qc4 Qf6+ 17.Qd4 Qc6+ 18.Kb3 Qf3+ The game had lasted 13 hours. Although the moves have not been optimal White was still winning but now he throws it away. 19.Qc3?? Fortunately for Pachmann the mistake is reciprocated the very next move. 19...Qb7+?? (19...Qd5+=; 19...Qf7+=) 20.Qb4! White sets up a deadly discovered check. This idea is worth remembering as it often occurs in this type of ending. 20...Qd5+ 21.Ka3+ Kc2 22.Qb2+ and white wins because the move 23. Qb3+, exchanging the queens cannot be avoided.

5...Kb1

6.Qd4!..

This is the key move to the ending and makes it comprehensible. It is amazing how long the Queen stands on the d4 square and is an important feature. The pawn is guarded and the important defensive square a1 is denied to the Black King. White now seeks to hide from the checks. With a long clockwise manoeuvre, the King goes behind the Queen and on to the same rank on which the enemy King stands. This makes it possible for the Queens to be exchanged.

6...Ka2

7.Kb5...

The ending from this point also coincides with the analysis from a Soviet database. ( Komissarchik and Futer , 1973)

7...Qe8+

8.Kb4 Qe1+

Komissarchik and Futer database chose the longer way to win with: 8...Qb8+ 9.Kc3 Qg3+ 10.Kd2 Qg2+ 11.Ke1 Qh1+ 12.Kf2 Qh2+ 13.Kf3 Qh3+ 14.Kf4 Qh2+ 15.Kg5 Qg3+ 16.Kf6 Qf3+ 17.Ke6 Qc6+ and the position now coincides with the main line after blacks 12th move.

9.Kc4 Qe2+

10.Kd5 Qb5+

11.Ke6 Qe8+

12.Kf6 Qc6+

13.Ke5 Qe8+

14.Kf4 ...

The King continues its clockwise journey around its Queen seeking a haven from the checks.

14... Qf7+

15.Kg3 Qg6+

16.Kh3 Qh7+

17.Kg2 Qg6+

18.Kf1 Qb1+ Black has only one reasonable check. 19.Ke2 Qb5+ 20.Kd2 The King at last finds a safe haven.20... Qb3 Even before the analysis of this ending with databases it had been known that this position is a win for White. 21.Qd3 Komissarchik and Futer database gives: 21.Qa7+ Kb2 22.Qf2 Qg8 23.Qb6+ Ka3 24.Qb7 Ka4 25.Kc3 Ka5 26.Qb4+ Ka6 27.Qc4+ Wins as the Queens are exchanged. 21...Qg8 White now wins wth a mating attack 22.Qa6+ Kb3 23.Qb5+ Ka3 24.Qb7 Qa2+ 25.Kd3 Qg8 26.Kc3 Qe6 27.Qa8+ Qa6 28.Qxa6#

A very tricky ending but a few simple ideas guide us through the maze of variations which we now summarise:

Black has to hinder the pawn from queening. This can be done by: 1.checking; 2.occupying the queening square; 3. controlling the queening square. The King has to get away from the pawn as far as possible. This gives the Black Queen more checking power and helps to avoid the Queen exchange. The best defensive squares for the King are at a1,a2, b1or b2.

White has two weapons at its command: 1. the power of the centralized Queen; 2. the interposed or crosscheck. The White Queen has to maximize her potential by finding a central square from which to operate. The d4 square is an excellent position for the Queen for besides guarding the pawn she has great influence here and helps to cut down the squares available to the Black Queen for checking. The White King has to find a refuge from the checks by going behind the Queen. Lining up of the Kings takes place i.e. going towards the same rank, diagonal or file in which the Black King is positioned. This increases the chance of the Queens being exchanged by a crosscheck. A difficult ending but worthy of study and one in which our understanding has been enhanced by computer analysis.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 13th JUNE


ARCHIVES

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5/12/98 

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29/11/98 

Position 65 

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Position 64 

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Position 63 

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8/11/98 

Position 62 

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Position 61 

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Position 60

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Selesniev

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