PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 9/5/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 88 

Black to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/pb3p2/4p1pp/2p3k1/2P5/5P1P/PP4P1/1B4K1: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 87 

Joseph Blackburne (1841-1920) was one of the top six players in the world and for many years Englands greatest player. He was coached by Horwitz, the famous endgame expert, who made him an excellent player in this sphere of the game. He became even more renowned for his attacking play and because of this was known as the Black Death. He had many tournament successes and kept his form even into old age: In his 70's he tied 1st place with Yates for the British Championship. His influence on the growth of chess in his own country was immense and he is still remembered with high regard.

Blackburne vs Schlechter

Leipzig, 1894

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:3k2n1/1pb2p1p/p1p2p2/P1P1pN2/1PK1P3/2P3PB/7P/8:

Blacks pieces lack mobility. The Black Bishop has become imprisoned by the queenside pawns whereas the White Bishop has a beautiful diagonal on which to operate. Black has a number of weak pawns; b7, f6, f7 & h7 which can be attacked by Whites more active pieces. The White knight is always threatening to go to d6 from where it can attack some of these pawns. All this adds up to an overwhelming positional advantage for White. 

1.Kd3! ...

Blackburne goes for the simple win. The King will infiltrate into Blacks kingside to aid the attack. A more complicated way is to play:1.Nd6 Bxd6 2.cxd6 Nh6 3.Kc5 f5 4.exf5 e4 5.Kd4 Kd7 6.c4 Kxd6+-

1... Bb8

Playing 1...Ne7? is no good because after the exchange of the Knights the White Bishop moves to c8 winning the queenside pawns.

2.Ke3 Bc7

3.Kf3 Bb8

4.Kg4 Bc7

5.Kh5 Ke8

Black has no real defence against White's plan.

6.Nd6+ Bxd6

Black has no choice. The passed d-pawn ties him down.

7.cxd6 Kd8

Black had to stop the Bishop going to ...c8

8.Bf5! WINS

After 8...h6 9.Bh7 The Knight is lost.

A wonderful example of a simple winning plan carried out in a logical way. The masters of the last century were the pioneers of practical endgame play and we mustn't forget their influence on the game. They often had to endure long dangerous journeys, some taking over a month, to play in parts of the world relatively unknown to them. With the arrival of the silicon chip it would be easy to ignore and even denigrate their contribution to the royal game, but this would be a grave injustice to their memory. I don't think much can be gained by comparing the strengths of players from a different era because so many other factors have to be considered. It is my premise that on occasions the endgame play of old masters reached heights which have only been equalled but never surpassed even by modern standards. It may be true to say that with the advent of QP finishes the standard of endgame play amongst humans generally may not be improving and may even be in decline!! Please don't misunderstand me, I am not for "turning the clock back" only for recognition of achievements gained in the past.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 13th JUNE


ARCHIVES

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS