PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY. 16/5/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 89

White to Play & WIN  

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:2b4k/8/5P2/8/3N2p1/4r3/8/B1K5: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 88 

Efim Bogoljubow (1889-1952) was born in Russsia but became a German citizen in 1927. In the 1920s he became one of the strongest players in the world, winning both the Soviet championship and the German Open in 1924. He won the Soviet championship again in 1925 and scored his finest achievement by winning the Moscow International tournament ahead of Lasker, Capablanca and Rubinstein. His optimistic attacking style was ideal for tournament chess but was less successful in match play. He played Alekhine in two World Championship matches (1929, 1934) but lost each time. He contributed to the hypermodern movement with the invention of the Bogo-Indian defence. Bogoljubow was always a dangerous opponent and he made a big impact on Chess in Germany. 

Rubinstein vs Bogoljubow

Triberg, 1921

Black to Play & WIN  

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/pb3p2/4p1pp/2p3k1/2P5/5P1P/PP4P1/1B4K1: 

Rubinstein played a long combination to reach this ending thinking his Queenside-majority would win but Black has a number of positional advantages. His King is much further advanced and will have invasion squares into Whites position and his Bishop is more mobile. The kingside pawns can be fixed on white squares so they will become subject to attack by the Bishop. The three queenside pawns can be held back by two of Blacks pawns so they pose no real threat. All this adds up to a winning advantage for Black: 

1... h5!

2.Kf2 h4!

Black fixes the kingside pawns to white squares so they cannot escape the attack by the Bishop. This will also mean the King will be able to invade via the weakened dark squares.

2...e5 3.Ke3 f5 4.a3 a5 5.Bc2 h4 6.b3 Kf6 7.Bd3 g5 8.Bb1 e4 9.fxe4 Ke5 10.Bd3 Bxe4 11.Bf1 g4 12.hxg4 fxg4 13.Kf2 Kd4. Black wins. Genius 3.

3.Ke3 ...

He has to try and stop the King going to f4.

3... f5

4.Bd3 a5

5.a3 Kf6

6.Be2 g5

7.Bf1 Ke5

Black takes advantage of the weakened dark squares.

8.Be2 Bc6

9.Bd1 Be8

10.b3 Bg6

This Bishop manoeuvre makes it possible for Black to infiltrate into Whites position.

11.Kd3....

White cannot guard both entry squares d4 and f4. If 11.Bc2 f4+ 12.Kd2 Bxc2 13.Kxc2 Kd4 14.a4 e5 15.Kd2 e4 and Black wins.

11...Be8 He should have played ...Kf4! 12.Kc3 Bc6 13.Be2 Kf4! 14.b4 Kg3! 15.b5 The queenside pawns are no threat because they are not supported. Bb7 16.f4 g4 17.hxg4 fxg4 White Resigns.

One of the tenet's of the Steinitz positional theory was the advantage that comes from the creation of a Queenside pawn majority. These pawns could be advanced and hopefully a passed pawn could be created which would lead to a win in the endgame. However in some situations the creation of this majority is not always advantageous. In the 20's the hypermoderns, which included Bogoljubow, revolted against the blind acceptence of this theory pointing out that the placing of pawns and activity of the pieces was also important.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 13th JUNE


ARCHIVES

9/5/99

Position 87

Blackburne

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

13/12/98 

Position 67 

Kashdan 

5/12/98 

Position 66 

Reti 

29/11/98 

Position 65 

Fischer 

22/11/98 

Position 64 

Ratner 

15/11/98 

Position 63 

Capablanca 

8/11/98 

Position 62 

Zepler 

1/11/98 

Position 61 

Szabo  

26/10/98 

Position 60

Liburkin 

18/10/98

Position 59

Janowski

11/10/98

Position 58

Selesniev

Pre 11/10/98 Archives

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