PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

FOR 30/5/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 91

White to Play & DRAW  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1Pb58/8/1rB1P1P1/R3p1p1/1p6/2K3k1: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 90

Dr Siegbert Tarrasch (1862-1934) German Grandmaster, was a very great player who in the winter of 1890 could have played Steinitz for the World Championship but let the opportunity pass him by. After Emanuel Lasker had arrived on the scene and became the World Champion in 1894, Tarrasch was never really in contention for the title, losing the 1908 match against him easily. He compensated for not winning the crown by becoming an important chess writer and theoretician, explaining the difficult theories of Steinitz clearly. His two best books: Three Hundred Best Games and The Game of Chess showed he was a writer and teacher of a high standard. Tarrasch was a great disciple of chess and spread the gospel even in difficult times. "Chess, like music, like love, has the power to make men happy."  

Tarrasch vs Reti

Vienna, 1922

White to Play & WIN  

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:r5k1/4Rp1p/2q2npB/3pQp2/3P4/2P4P/5PP1/6K1: 

In his early days Tarrasch passed on the revolutionary theories of Steinitz to his fellow players but now in the twilight of his career he faced a breed of younger men who had their own ideas of how the game should be played. He relished the chance to play the hypermoderns and he occasionally inflicted a devastating defeat.

 1.Rc7! ...

White has a strong attack which he converts to a won ending.

1... Qe6

Black has to stop 2.Qe7 with a winning attack

2.Qxe6 fxe6

White wants to attack the weak e-pawn but first he drives the King away.

3.Rg7+ Kh8

4.Re7 Kg8

5.f3! ...

White constricts the influence of the Knight.

5... Ne8

6.Kh2 ...

Beginning a journey which makes this ending memorable.

6... Nd6

7.Rg7+ Kh8

8.Rd7 Nb5

9.Kg3 Nxc3

In many endings it is the influence of the King which makes the difference. Black is really playing with a piece down.

10.Kf4 Nb5

11.Ke5 Re8

12.Kf6 ...

Black Resigns

The threat of King to f7 is devastating and Black has no real answer. Play might have continued: 12...Kg8 13.Rg7+ Kh8 14.Rb7 Nd6 15.Rd7 Nb5 16.Kf7 Rg8 17.Rd8!

No chess education is complete without a knowledge of the classics. Mikhail Shereshevsky, a top Russian coach has argued that it is important for a young aspiring student to know how chess ideas evolved. He believes that such an education must start with the theory of Steinitz. The first World Champion introduced a number of new techniques to the game which today we take for granted. The ideas of the advantage of the Bishop pair, the Queen side majority, the active King were contributions that Steinitz made to the game. But he was never very good at communicating them. It was Tarrasch who went a step further and moulded them into a coherent theory and made them popular. It was through his games and teaching that he became the chief representative of the Classical School of Chess


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 

Click here >> Solutions 

Next competition starts: 13th JUNE


ARCHIVES

23/5/99

Position 89

Selman

16/5/99

Position 88

Bogoljubow

9/5/99

Position 87

Blackburne

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

Pre 20/12/98 Archives

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