PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

6/6/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 92

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/5br1/pk4pR/3p1pP1/1K1PpN2/1P2P3/5P2/8:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 91

Jan Marwitz (1915-1991), Excellent Dutch Composer who in a career spanning six decades composed over 100 studies and won many prizes.

Jan Marwitz, 1942

White to Play & DRAW  

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1Pb58/8/1rB1P1P1/R3p1p1/1p6/2K3k1:

Black is threatening to take both the Bishop  and the Rook. White cannot save both pieces so he gives up the Rook. At first this seems an illogical choice, giving up the major piece but White has a cunning plan to immobilize the Black Rook and to keep the enemy King from entering the game.

1.Rc6! bxc6

2.b4! ...

The Black Rook is now imprisoned and White can mark time by playing the Kc7-c8 shuffle. In the meantime can Black's forces help the Rook to escape?

2... Kf7

3.Kc7 Ke8

4.Kc8 Bd3

5.Kc7 ...

Black cannot make any progress, the Rook cannot escape so he decides to sacrifice it:

3... Rxc5!

6.bxc5 Bb5

The pawn is defended. If Black tries to evict the King: 6...Ba6 7.Kb6 Bc8 8.Kc7 and White has a stalemate. Bd7 9.Kd6 Kd8=

7.Kc8 Ke7

It is a POSITIONAL DRAW. Black has a material advantage but cannot free his King because of the position of the White monarch. The only try for Black will lead to stalemate.

8.Kc7 Ba6

9.Kb6 Bc8

10.Kc7 Bd7 11.Kb8 Kd8 12.Kb7 Bc8+ 13.Kb8 Kd7 14.Ka8!! (14.Ka7? The King can now be evicted and Black wins easily: 14...Kc7 15.Ka8 Bb7+ 16.Ka7 Kc8 17.Kb6 Kb8 18.Ka5 Ka7-+ ) 14...Kc7 15.Ka7 Bb7 DRAW.

This study is a good example of the POSITIONAL DRAW. This is a study term for a drawn position in which Black has a material advantage but cannot win because his pieces are at a positional disadvantage.

Conventional chess programs have a problem with analysing many of these positional draws. Here I am thinking of positions which are drawn but show a big material difference between each side. The program evaluation function in such endings often does not reflect the true nature of the position. This is because the usual material assessments no longer count. In the above study Black is given 3.00 (+) for the position when it is really 0.00 (=). The Bishop is useless in the attempt to free the Black King therefore it is of little value and the computer evaluation should show the position is drawn 0.00(=). The problem will eventually be overcome by the computer being able to access a huge database of these known "positional draws" and being able to absorb their true value into its evaluation function. I do hope that programmers will soon get to grips with this problem because this is a serious handicap in the computer analysis of many endings. Please free me from the cynical view that because such an improvement may not neccessarily show itself in increased grading points and thus commercial gain, it will not be tackled.

Positional drawn positions are an example of what I call IMAGE POSITIONS. The human eye can see at a glance that some positions are drawn. This is because these images are processed immediately by the brain which already has a store of chess knowledge and related images. Their understanding doesn't depend on the power of calculation but in the analysis of the image. These type of positions are usually strategic in nature and often depend on the pawn structure.The human brain relying on image analysis rather than calculating power is quicker and can see at a glance that the position is drawn. 

Summer Solving Tournament starting on 13th JUNE and lasting for eight weeks. Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !! 


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 


ARCHIVES

30/5/99

Position 90

Tarrasch

23/5/99

Position 89

Selman

16/5/99

Position 88

Bogoljubow

9/5/99

Position 87

Blackburne

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

Pre 20/12/98 Archives

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