PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

3/7/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Mike Fitch
THIS WEEK

POSITION 96

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:3rr1k1/p1p2ppp/1p3n2/2PP4/8/4BP2/P4P1P/1R1R2K1:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 95

Josef Moravec (1882-1969) a brilliant first generation Czech composer who had a long and distinguished career. He has over 200 endgame studies to his credit.

J. Moravec, 1937

White to Play & WIN 

FORSYTH NOTATION :1R6/2pk4/1P6/8/3r4/K7/P7/8: 

Moravec gained a reputation in producing excellent studies with Rook and pawn endings. Many composers would regard this as unlikely material in which to produce anything terribly exciting. White's following Rook sacrifice followed by Blacks near remarkable defence produces a memorable ending.

1.Rd8+! ...

1.b7 Kc6=;

1.Rb7 Kc6 2.Rxc7+ Kxb6=

1... Kxd8

2.b7 Rb4!

This defensive sacrifice of the Rook fails by just one tempo. This idea had been known from a famous simultaneous game between Lasker and Loman. (See below)

3.Kxb4 c5+

So we see the idea behind the sacrifice. The King can now stop the b-pawn but White can bring up the other pawn.

4.Kb5! ...

The King bypasses the poisoned pawn.

4.Kxc5 Kc7=

4... Kc7

5.Ka6 Kb8

The following moves should be easy to understand. White plays a mating attack against the enemy Monarch which only just wins.

6.Kb6 c4

7.a4 c3

8.a5 c2

9.a6 c1Q

10.a7 Mate

The idea of sacrificing the Rook to bring the King to an unfavourable square comes from a famous simultaneous game. The ending reached this critical position:

:5k2/1p4pP/p7/1p1p4/8/2r3K1/6PP/8:

Emanuel Lasker, the reigning World Champion playing White against the Dutch player Loman (Berlin 1914) thought it didn't matter where he placed his King after the check because he was winning with his h-pawn, so he played 1.Kg4? This move was the wrong decision. It loses to the following variation which includes the beautiful sacrifice of the Rook: 1....Rc4 2.Kg5 Rh4!! 3.Kxh4 g5+! 4.Kxg5 Kg7-+. If Lasker played his King to the second rank he would have avoided this variation and been able to promote his h-pawn. So we see a trick sometimes used in endgame composition; borrowing an idea that has occured in a practical game and extending it. The reverse happens; in a practical ending a player uses an idea that he has discovered in a study. This is sometimes the only way to win. It is this cross fertilization of ideas which makes endings so richly rewarding and attractive to play.


11/7/99 This weeks position has been delayed 24hrs due to late return from my holiday. Sorry to cause any inconvenience. Position 97 will occur on Monday 20:00 GMT.


Apeldoorn Chess Week 12th -17th July 1999. See Links Page.
Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

STARTS NOW: Click here >> positions Have a go !!

Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !! 
  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 


ARCHIVES

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Position 94

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