PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

25/7/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


THIS WEEK

POSITION 99

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:q7/5p2/3R4/4k3/7P/2K4B/5R2/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 98

Sultan Khan, Mir (1905-66) A natural chess genius who overcame all obstacles to become a world class player. After winning the All-Indian championship in 1928 he played in the 1929 British Championship and to everyone's surprise he won the tournament. A brilliant achievement considering he had very little experience of the Western game and could not read or speak English. He again won the British Championship in 1932 and 1933. He played first board for the British Olympiad team of 1930 (65%), 1931 (68%) and 1933 (50%). At Hastings 1930-31 he came 3rd, beating Capablanca in their individual game. In December of 1933 Sultan returned to India, his short but brilliant international career was over.

Sultan Khan vs Flohr,

London Match 3rd Game, 1932

White to Play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION: 8/p3kp1p/p3p1p1/P1PpP3/3P4/1rPK4/2R2RPP/1r6:

Earlier  in the game Black could have played his King to c6 to blockade the passed pawn and then play a Rook to b7 to guard the f7 pawn. The outcome would probably have been a draw. But now the c-pawn can advance and Whites game springs into life.

1.c6! Rb8

2.c4! ...

White has to support the pawn so he takes the opportunity of getting rid of a weakness.

2... R1b3+

3.Rc3 dxc4+

4.Kxc4 R3b4+

Perhaps more testing is: 4...Rxc3+ 5.Kxc3 Rc8 6.d5! exd5 7.Rf6 Rb8 8.Kd4 Rb2 9.Kxd5 and the win is not easy because of the active Rook.

5.Kd3 Rc8

6.Ke3 Rb5

7.Ra2 Rf8

He wants to brings his King over to blockade the pawn.

8.g4 Kd8

9.c7+ ...

White now pushes the pawn forward with check, knowing that it is safe from being attacked by both Rooks.

9... Kc8

10.Rf2! ...

The beginning of a brilliant plan which is worthy of a great player. The a-pawn is be sacrificed for a winning attack.

10... Rxa5

Winning the c-pawn is no better: 10...Rb7 11.Rc6! Rxc7 12.Rxe6! fxe6 13.Rxf8+ Kb7 (13...Kd7 14.Rf7+ Kc6 15.Rxc7+ Kxc7 16.g5+-) 14.Re8+-

11.Rc6! ...

Threatening 12.Rxe6! fxe6 13.Rxf8+ Kxc7 14.Rf7+-

11... Ra3+

12.Ke4 Kd7

This is a waste of time. Black stops Rxe6 but it allows another combination with the same result.

13.Rxf7+! Kxc6

14.Rxf8 Kxc7

15.Rf7+ Kd8

15...Kc6 is also losing; 16.Re7 Rh3 17.Rxe6+ Kb5 18.Kd5 Rxh2 19.Re8 Kb4 20.e6 Re2 21.e7 Ka3 22.Kd6+-

16.Rxh7 ...

White is now easily winning the ending with his pawns in the centre. The rest of the game is given for completness:

16...g5 17.Rg7 Rh3 18.Rxg5 Rxh2 19.Rg8+ Kc7 20.Rg6 a5 21.Rxe6 Kb7 22.Rf6 Rg2 23.e6 Rxg4+ 24.Kd5 Kc7 25.Rf7+ Kd8 26.Rxa7 Rh4 27.Kc5 Black Resigns. 

A great ending against a player who was soon to be considered a possible contender for the world championship and who eventually became a top Soviet trainer. The way Sultan used the passed c-pawn to drive the Black pieces into passive positions and his own Rooks to create threats along the half-open files and ranks is very instructive. It shows how strong a Rook can be controlling the seventh rank. This double Rook ending is one of a number played by Sultan Khan. He had a quiet, subtle, positional style which was well suited to play long strategic endings. His win against Capablanca at Hastings 30/31, using double Rooks against a Queen, was a sensation and I am surprised it is not mentioned more often in the anthologies.


Summer Endgame Solving Tournament.

STARTS NOW: Click here >> positions Have a go !!

Positions to solve on long holiday journeys or when sunbathing on the beach !! 
  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION PRIZE WORTH £100

Open to humans only. The winner will have to take part in 3 or more solving competitions before Feb 2000. The usual rules apply. The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count.The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. Feb 2000 exchange rates will apply. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 


ARCHIVES

18/7/99

Position 97

Zakhodyakin

11/7/99

Position 96

Mieses

4/7/99

Position 95

Moravec

27/6/99

Position 94

Znosko-Borovsky

20/6/99

Position 93

J. Ban

13/6/99

Position 92

Lilienthal

6/6/99

Position 91

Marwitz

30/5/99

Position 90

Tarrasch

23/5/99

Position 89

Selman

16/5/99

Position 88

Bogoljubow

9/5/99

Position 87

Blackburne

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

Pre 20/12/98 Archives

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