PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

22/8/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Peter Berelos, Herryk Kalafut, Mike Fitch and Paul Cheng
THIS WEEK

POSITION 103

White to Play & DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:k3B2r/rn6/8/3N4/7B/1K6/8/8:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 102

Lodewijk Prins (1913-?) Dutch International Master. National Champion from 1965-67. For many years he was on the staff of the Technical University of Enschede. He represented his country in an unbroken run of 12 Olympiads, from 1937 to 1968, which is probably a record for this event. He was  co-author with Euwe of a biography of Capablanca Het Schaakphenomeen Capablanca.

Prins vs Kotov

Amsterdam, 1954

White to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:7n/p6p/1pp2k2/2P1pPpB/6P1/2P5/P6P/2K5: 

This game is one of the highlights of Prins long career. Grandmaster Kotov had played the queenless middlegame carelessly and now found himself defending a difficult ending. White has a protected passed pawn which gives him a tangible advantage. Although the Bishop looks uncomfortable at h5 it keeps the Knight hemmed in the corner and still has the e8 square in which to attack the pawns. Whites winning method is to gain the exchange of the minor pieces so he can reach a won King and pawn ending.

1.cxb6! ...

1.Kd2? was the move played in the game and it is only good to draw but Black with his very next move did not take the opportunity: 1...Ng6? 2.fxg6 hxg6 3.cxb6 axb6 4.c4 gxh5 5.c5! b5 6.gxh5 g4 7.Ke3 Kg5 8.Ke4 Kxh5 9.Kxe5 Kh4 10.Kf6!! A beautiful move to find in the heat of the battle. 10...Kh5 (10...Kh3 11.Kg5 wins) 11.a3! WINS. He should have taken the pawn at c5 to draw: 1...bxc5! 2.Kd3 Ng6 3.fxg6 hxg6 4.Ke4! (4.Bxg6 Kxg6-+) 4...gxh5 5.gxh5 g4 6.h6 Kg6 7.h7 Kxh7 8.Kf5 Kg7 9.Kxg4=

1... axb6

2.a4!...

Another way to win is 2.Be8 c5 3.a4 +- The Bishop forces the pawns to take up a weak formation in which they can easily be attacked by the King. The above move has the advantage of being a reasonably straight forward way to win.

2...Ng6

If the Knight stays at h8 White will easily win by advancing his King and attacking the weak pawns .

3.fxg6 hxg6

Now the King is free from blockading the passed pawn.

4.Bxg6! Kxg6

5.c4! ...

The threat is 5.c5 creating a passed pawn.

5... c5

6.Kd2 Kf6

7.Ke3 Ke7

8.Ke4 Ke6

9.h3! ...

Black is forced to give way and lose the e-pawn. White will win by creating a passed pawn on the kingside.

9...Kf610.Kd5 e4 11.Kxe4 Ke6 12.Kf3 Ke5 13.Kg3 Kd4 14.h4 gxh4+ 15.Kxh4 Kxc4 16.g5 and the ending is easily won.

Solutions to the Summer Endgame Solving Tournament and Winners names and grades will appear on Sunday  5th SEPTEMBER  


Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION 


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.

 

Patrick Peschlow of Germany wins the EASTER Endgame Solving Tournament scoring grade A and leads the race for the millennium prize. There is a tie for second place between David Rowe, Mike Fitch and Henryk Kalafut scoring B+

 

 

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

 

 

A A

B+B+

B+

B+

 


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