PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

5/9/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Peter Berelos, Mike Fitch, Paul Cheng and Herryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 105

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION :5K2/R7/8/4p3/8/p5p1/1k4P1/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 104 

Alberic O'Kelly de Galway (1911-80) International Grandmaster. Winner of the third World Correspondence Championship (1959-62). He won the Belgian Championship many times and played for his country in 8 Olympiads between 1937 and 1968. He was a fine author and linguist and was the chief arbiter at the World Championship matches of 1966 and 1969.

Pritchard vs O'Kelly

Bognor Regis, 1960

Black to Play & WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/5pkp/3p4/p1pPn1pB/PpP1P3/1P4P1/6KP/8:

For many years the theoretical controversy about the respective merits of the Knight and the Bishop has raged on. Having the minor exchange, the Bishop rather than the knight, may be an advantage in many endings but it really does depend on the individual characteristics of the position. In closed endings the Bishop is weaker especially if its pawns are placed on the same colour as the cleric. Here the Knight reigns supreme because Black takes the opportunity to put the Bishop out of touch of his flock.

1. g4!!

This move is not about winning a Bishop by ...Kh6 but closing the diagonal d1-h5 limiting its power and making the Knight sacrifice possible.

2.h3 Nxc4!

The Knight cannot be taken because the b-pawn easily promotes.

3.hxg4 ...

3.Bxg4 Ne3+ 4.Kf3 Nxg4 5.hxg4 c4! 6.Ke3 cxb3 7.Kd2 Kf3 Black wins.

3... Nd2!

The Knight attacks the b-pawn while the Bishop is out of play.

Another way to win is to play: 3... f6 4.g5 Nd2 5.Bd1 fxg5 6.Bc2 c4 7.bxc4 b3 8.Bd3 Kf6 9.Kf2 b2 10.c5 dxc5 11.d6 Ke6 12.e5 b1Q 13.Bxb1 Nxb1 -+

4.e5 ...

White creates his own passed pawn but it is not enough to avoid defeat.

(4.g5 Nxe4 5.Kf3 Nd2+ 6.Ke3 Nxb3 7.Be2 f6 8.gxf6+ Kxf6 -+)

4... c4!

5.exd6 Kf8

The King takes care of the d-pawn.

6.g5 cxb3

7.Bg4 b2

The Bishop gets back in the game but it is all to late.

8.Bf5 b1Q

9.Bxb1 Nxb1 -+

Black wins.

The standard of entries for the summer competition was very high. Position 1 was fairly easy to solve but the other positions were difficult. The Dolan study is renouned for its complexity. I think the Simkhovitch study, position 5 is under a cloud. There seems to be more than one way to draw this ending. This is a shame because I like the composers idea very much. Congratulations to the winners and thanks to the competitors for taking part. The Millennium prize is now between the competitors mentioned in the score table below.

>> Winners + Solutions 


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Vojna Alexander UKRAINE

Peter Bereolos USA

 

 

 

A A B+

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B+A

B+B+

A

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ARCHIVES

29/8/99

Position 103

Gurvich

22/8/99

Position 102

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15/8/99

Position 101

Peckover

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Position 100

Mikenas

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Position 99

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Position 76

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Position 73

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Position 69

Foltys

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Przepiorka

Pre 20/12/98 Archives

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