PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

12/9/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Peter Berelos, Mike Fitch, Patrick Peschlow, Paul Cheng and Herryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 106

Black to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION :3r4/5k2/1p3b1p/2p2p2/p1b2B2/P1P3PP/1P3K2/2N1R3:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 105

Israel Horowitz (1907-1973) International Master and leading US player in the 1930s. He won the US Open in 1936, 1938 and 1948. From 1931-1950 he played for his country in 4 Olympiads scoring 75% (+29=19-3). His greatest contribution to chess was helping to keep the game alive in the recession years of the 30s. He was proprietor and editor of Chess Review which was America's only major chess magazine for many years.

I. Horowitz, 1929

White to Play & WIN 

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION :5K2/R7/8/4p3/8/p5p1/1k4P1/8:

An endgame composition of a practical situation which we are often faced with over the board. White seems to have a difficult task. Black has two passed pawns and White's King is a long distance away. In this situation no move can be wasted: the King must head towards the other side of the board.

1.Ke7! ...

1.Kf7? e4 2.Kf6 e3 3.Kf5 a2 4.Rb7+ Kc2 5.Ra7=;

1.Re7? a2 2.Rb7+ Kc2 3.Ra7=

1....a2

2.Kd6! e4

3.Kc5! e3

Queening the a-pawn would lose easily: 3.a1Q 4.Ra1 Kxa1 5.Kd4+- and Blacks pawns are lost. It is a feature of this study that the promotion of the a-pawn never works because after the exchanges the Black King is too far away to defend his pawns.

4.Kb4!! ...

This is the key move to the study. The Kings have to be in opposition for Whites winning idea to work.

4...e2

Black is now threatening to win by queening the a-pawn and the e-pawn will not be caught. So White switches his Rook to the e-file.

5.Re7! a1Q

5.a1N 6.Rxe2 Nc2+7.Kc4 Kb1 8.Kc3 Na3 9.Kb3+-

6.Rxe2+ Kb1

Now we see why it was important for the Kings to be in opposition. The monarch is forced to the back rank and the Rook skewer wins for White.

7.Re1+ Kb2

8.Rxa1 Kxa1

9.Kc3 WINS

As some of you mentioned, the diagonal King walk is some what reminiscent of Reti's famous King & pawn study. There seems to be some confusion in the literature about the origin of Position 105 but this is understandable when you consider the likeness in the spelling of the names of the two composers involved. Comprehensive Chess Endings Vol 5 (Averbakh) gives Bernard Horwitz as the composer and quotes the date 1879 but I am 99% certain that it belongs to Israel Horowitz. It is to be found in his own book: How to win in the Endings (1957) which is excellent to study if you are new to the endgame. Here he explains the basics in a nice slow manner with plenty of diagrams which is ideal for learners. 


SUMMER ENDGAME COMPETITION >> Winners + Solutions
 


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Vojna Alexander UKRAINE

Peter Bereolos USA

 

 

 

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ARCHIVES

5/9/99

Position 104

O'Kelly

29/8/99

Position 103

Gurvich

22/8/99

Position 102

Prins

15/8/99

Position 101

Peckover

8/8/99

Position 100

Mikenas

1/8/99

Position 99

Roycroft

25/7/99

Position 98

Sultan Khan

18/7/99

Position 97

Zakhodyakin

11/7/99

Position 96

Mieses

4/7/99

Position 95

Moravec

27/6/99

Position 94

Znosko-Borovsky

20/6/99

Position 93

J. Ban

13/6/99

Position 92

Lilienthal

6/6/99

Position 91

Marwitz

30/5/99

Position 90

Tarrasch

23/5/99

Position 89

Selman

16/5/99

Position 88

Bogoljubow

9/5/99

Position 87

Blackburne

2/5/99

Position 86

L.Pachman

25/4/99

Position 85

Chigorin

18/4/99

Position 84

Bernstein

11/4/99

Position 83

Riumin

28/3/99

Position 82

Rauzer

21/3/99

Position 81

Mason

14/3/99

Position 80

Bron

7/3/99

Position 79

Pillsbury

28/2/99

Position 78

Troitzky

21/2/99

Position 77

Teichmann

14/2/99

Position 76

Horwitz

7/2/99

Position75

Yates

31/1/99

Position 74

J.Behting

24/1/99

Position 73

Tartakower

17/1/99

Position72

Rinck

10/1/99

Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

Pre 20/12/98 Archives

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