PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

19/9/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Paul Cheng and Herryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 107

White to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/2B5/8/5B2/k7/P4n2/2Kp1rP1/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 106

Wilhelm Steinitz (1836-1900) The first World Champion. Born in Bohemia but played most of his chess in England and the United States. Steinitz is regarded as the father of modern chess strategy. His positional ideas changed the way the game was played. He introduced a number of new techniques: the advantage of the Bishop pair, the Queen side majority, the active King were all contributions he made to the game.   

 Englisch vs Steinitz

London, 1863

Black to Play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION :3r4/5k2/1p3b1p/2p2p2/p1b2B2/P1P3PP/1P3K2/2N1R3:

In 1862 Louis Paulsen won an impressive game against Hannah in the London tournament in which he demonstrated the advantage of retaining the Bishops against two knights in the ending. Was this the beginning of modern chess strategy? Steinitz played in the same tournament and was aware of this game and now a year later he uses a similar technique. Here he shows the superiority of the Bishop pair against a Bishop and Knight.

1...Bg5!

2.Re5! ...

This is much stronger than the move played in the game. 2.Bxg5? hxg5 3.Ke3 Kf6 4.h4 gxh4 5.gxh4 Re8+ 6.Kf2 Rxe1 7.Kxe1 Ke5 8.Ne2 Bxe2 9.Kxe2 Black wins the King and pawn ending but it is close. 9...Kf4 10.c4 Kg4 11.Ke3 f4+ (not 11...Kxh4 12.Kf4!+-) 12.Ke4 f3 13.Ke3 Kg3 White resigned. At an early stage in his career Steinitz shows his great strength in the endgame.

2...Kf6

3.Ke1...

White stops the invasion of the Rook.

3...Bxf4

4.gxf4 h5

5.Re3 ...

White wants to develop his Knight without allowing the enemy rook to d3.

5.Ne2? Rd3! 6.Ng1 Bb5 7.h4 Rg3 8.Kf2 Rg4 9.Rd5 Rxf4+-+

5...h4

6.Rf3 Re8+

7.Kd2 Rg8

8.Nd3 Bxd3

9.Rxd3 ...

The Black Rook now finally invades and cuts off the King from the the rest of the board. 9...Rg2+ 10.Kc1 Ke6! Now it is the Black Kings turn to invade the White position. Steinitz who introduced the idea of the active King would have loved to play this position. 11.Re3+ Kd5! 12.Re5+ Kc4!13.Rxf5 Kb3 14.Rf6 Rc2+ 15.Kd1 Rxb2 16.Rxb6+ Kxa3 17.Rc6 Kb3 18.Rb6+ Kxc3-+ Black WINS.

In recent years there has been a rehabilitation of Steinitz's contribution to chess. The American publisher Pickard & Son has recently brought out: The Games of Wihelm Steinitz (1995) which covers his complete career and contains Steinitz's own annotations, informator style, to many of his games. Here we are dealing with a great player and theorist who brought to an end the Romantic era and replaced it with a positional approach which has stood the test of time. 


SUMMER ENDGAME COMPETITION >> Winners + Solutions
 


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Vojna Alexander UKRAINE

Peter Bereolos USA

 

 

 

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ARCHIVES

12/9/99

Position 105

I. Horowitz

5/9/99

Position 104

O'Kelly

29/8/99

Position 103

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Position 102

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Position 101

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Position 100

Mikenas

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Position 99

Roycroft

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Position 76

Horwitz

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31/1/99

Position 74

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24/1/99

Position 73

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17/1/99

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Position 71

Em Lasker

3/1/99

Position 70

Rossolimo

27/12/98

Position 69

Foltys

20/12/98

Position 68

Przepiorka

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