PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

24/10/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Paul Cheng, Mike Fitch, Tina & Hassan Aitlahcen, and Henryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 112

White to play & WIN (?)

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/7p/8/4k1p1/2K1P3/r7/P3R2P/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 111

Johannes Zukertort (1842-1888) World Championship contender. Born in Poland but became a professional player based in London. His greatest performance was in the London tournament of 1883 when he came 1st, three points ahead of Steinitz. Many people now considered him the strongest player in the world and it was fairly obvious he would soon have to play a match with Steinitz to decide the World Championship. This took place in 1886 but unfortunately his health was not up to such a gruelling match and he lost by a wide margin ( +5 -10 =5). 

Zukertort, 1863 

White to play & DRAW

FORSYTH NOTATION:5R2/4K1k1/8/8/1pp5/p7/8/8:

In the above setting Zukertort comes up with an idea which was first shown by Horwitz and Kling in a study in 1851 and which has been seen many times since. It is based on the idea of perpetual pursuit. Whites King is too far away to help stop the pawns from promoting and the Rook on its own will not be able to cope. Whites only hope is to mount a direct attack against the enemy monarch where it will be vulnerable at the edge of the board.

1.Rf1! b3

If 1...Kg6 then White draws similar to main line: 2.Ke6 b3 3.Rg1+ Kh5 4.Kf5=.

2.Rg1+ ...

The King is forced to the edge of the board.

2...Kh6

3.Kf6...

Now begins the perpetual persuit: Black's King has to avoid the classical King and Rook mate which is always threatened. He has no time to advance his pawns.

ee3...Kh5

4.Kf5 Kh4

5.Kf4 Kh3

6.Kf3 Kh2

7.Rg2+! Kh3

Not 7...Kh1?? 8.Kf2! and Black cannot stop mate

8.Rg1 DRAW

It is worth remembering this idea of perpetual pursuit because it often occurs in practical play. The most famous example with Rook and pawns is when Keres was playing Eliskases at Nordwyk in 1938.

:8/PP6/r7/8/8/2k5/8/1K6:

Eliskases who was Black found the draw with ...Rb6+ and there is no escape from the perpetual pursuit.

On his way to winning the London tournament of 1883, Zukertort played a number of fine endings which contributed to the knowledge of endgame theory at that time. Particularly memorable was his RPPvR ending in which he defeated Steinitz and his ending against Blackburne. Jimmy Adams has written a worthy biography:

Johannes Zukertort: Artist of the Chessboard (1989) 


IMPORTANT NOTICE

Last Monday there was a system failure at AOL which meant 9% of members sites could not be accessed which unfortunately included this site. This is a rare occurrence.

I have decided to take a domain name -

* www.chessending.com *

which can be used if a total breakdown occurs. *So please remember this address*

The present address:http://members.aol.com/brigosling will remain the site address so there is no need to change any settings at the moment. The domain name becomes operative after any prolonged failure (>24hrs) of the main site.


Autumn Endgame Solving Tournament. Click here >> positions

Winners names and Solutions will be published on 31/10/99.


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Henryk Kalafut of the United States wins in September.


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.

 

 

The overall scores for the millennium prize are as follows:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

David Rowe ENGLAND

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Vojna Alexander UKRAINE

Peter Bereolos USA

 

 

 

A A B+

B+B+B

B+A

B+B+

A

B+

 


ARCHIVES

17/10/99

Position 110

Torre

10/10/99

Position 109

Philidor

3/10/99

Position 108

Panov

26/9/99

Position 107

Herbstmann

19/9/99

Position 106

Steinitz

12/9/99

Position 105

I. Horowitz

5/9/99

Position 104

O'Kelly

29/8/99

Position 103

Gurvich

22/8/99

Position 102

Prins

15/8/99

Position 101

Peckover

8/8/99

Position 100

Mikenas

1/8/99

Position 99

Roycroft

25/7/99

Position 98

Sultan Khan

Pre 25/7/99 Archives

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