PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME or BRIAN'S CHESS FOLLY.

14/11/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Geoff Berryman, Paul Cheng, Henryk Kalafut, Peter Bereolos and Tina & Hassan Aitlahcen.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 115

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:n7/1p1k4/P2B3p/1R1p4/8/4qr2/Q6K/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 114

 Rudolph Charousek (1873-1900) Hungarian Grandmaster. A brilliant player who had a tragically short career dying from TB at the age of 27. In his first international tournament at Nurenberg in 1896 he beat the reigning World Champion Emanuel Lasker. Later that year he tied for 1st place with Chigorin at Budapest but lost the playoff. He won 1st at Berlin in 1897 and shared 2nd place at Cologne in 1898. With such excellent results he was seen as a possible challenger for the World Championship but he was becoming increasingly ill, in fact his life was slipping away. 

 Albin vs Charousek

Berlin, 1897

Black to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION :8/8/1k2Kp2/5Pp1/8/8/8/8: 

The KPPvPK endings are very important in practical play because many positions with pieces will be resolved into this class of ending. Strong players have been known to play these endings badly and even theoreticians have sometimes published faulty analysis about them. In the above position  Albin had just played 1.Kd5-e6? which as we will see later was a serious mistake. Charousek takes his chance.

1...g4!

1... Kc6? throws away the win: 2. Kxf6 g4 3.Ke7 g3 4.f6 g2 5. f7 g1Q 6.f8Q=

2.Kxf6 g3

3.Ke7 g2

4.f6 g1Q

5.f7 Qg7!

Pinning the pawn. An important technique in these type of endings.

5...Qg5+ also wins: 6.Ke8 Qg6 6.Ke7 Qg7+-

6.Ke8 ...

White must not allow the pawn to be blockaded with 6...Qf8

The Black King now enters the arena; if he had been on the a-file, say a6, he would have been too far away to carry out the winning plan and White would have drawn with the f-pawn.

6...Kc7!

The quickest way to win. Charousek played 6...Kc6 and the game continued 7.Ke7 Kc7 8.Ke8 ( Philip Sergeant in his wonderful book: Charousek's Games of Chess (1919) writes that Rudolph could have announced mate in 5 moves here. In fact it is mate in 3 moves: 8...Qg6! 9.Kf8 Qg5 10.Ke8 Qd8# ) 8...Qe5+ 9.Kf8 Qh8+ 10.Ke7 Qd1+ White Resigns.

7. Ke7 ...

7.f8Q Qd7#; 7.f8N Kd6 -+

7...Qe5+

8. Kf8 Qg5

9. Ke8 Qd8#

A few moves earlier before position 114 was reached Charousek had exchanged minor pieces probably thinking the ending was won for Black? When he was a schoolboy he borrowed the German Handbuch and copied it in full by hand !! He would have known of the example quoted, the blocked pawns being d-pawns rather than f-pawns, which gives a win to the stronger side and possibly he was trying to recall the analysis during the game:

:8/8/8/6k1/2Pp4/3P3K/8/8:

Black to play, White wins. 1...Kf5 2.Kg3 Kg5 3.Kf3 Kf5 4.Ke2 Kf4 5.Kd2 Ke5 6.Kc2 Kd6 7.Kb3 Kc5 8.Ka3 Kc6 9.Kb4 Kd6 10.c5+ WINS.

The main difference here is that White has room to manoeuvre on the other side of the blocked pawns, two files instead of one, to win the pawn. The weaker side has no defence to this plan. In the Charousek ending this method of winning is denied to the stronger side so with best play Albin could have drawn. Whites last move before position 114 was 1.Kd5-e6? By playing the King to d4!, taking the diagonal opposition, he could keep the enemy King away from the critical square c5. The Black Kings movement is restricted by the b5 pawn and must remain within its "square" to draw and at the same time it must also defend the critical squares of the f5 pawn which besides c5, are d5, e5, and h5. Thus keeping the enemy King away from attacking his f-pawn. The winning method in the Handbuch example is not applicable here because Black hasn't the room to manoeuvre on the h-file. White always answers ...Kh6 with Kg4!


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COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the new year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. Join now to book a place and get some practice. Present active cumulative participants will have priority of entry. This event will run from 3/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year.

Winners will be announced in January 2001.


 AUTUMN ENDGAME COMPETITION >>  Solutions + Winners

Vojna Alexander and Henryk Kalafut come joint first followed by Patrick Peschlow .


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Mike Fitch of the United States & Paul Cheng of Hong Kong win in October.


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.


ARCHIVES

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Roycroft

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Position 98

Sultan Khan

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