PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

19/12/99

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks Paul Cheng and Mike Fitch.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 120

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p4p1k/np4pp/4P3/2R1B3/P3KP2/6PP/3r4:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 119

Walter Veitch (1923- ) Player, composer and analyst who from 1966 to 1975 ran an important column in the endgame magazine EG. Started out as a player and at one time was number 2 in the British ratings behind Jonathon Penrose. He found himself increasingly drawn to endings and to providing analytical notes to EG, the magazine on endgame studies launched by John Roycroft in 1965. This grew to a regular column which became very popular among endgame study enthusiasts.

W. Veitch, 1967

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION: 8/6p1/6B1/4K3/4pN2/6p1/5b2/4N1k1:

How am I to solve this study?; it looks so complicated. If you are really lost then start with the basic question: What is the threat? This question has to be asked after each move. Before considering any White plan the immediate threat has to be dealt with. Black threatens to take the Knight with his Bishop, drawing the ending.

1.Neg2!...

White has a number of replies but only by playing the threatened Knight to g2 will he win.

1. Ne2+? Kf1 2.Nxg3+ Bxg3+ 3.Kxe4 Bxe1 4.Kf3=

1.Nc2? g2 2.Bxe4 Bg3 3.Ne3 g5=

1.Nfg2? Bxe1 2.Nxe1 Kf2 3.Kxe4 Kxe1 4.Kf3=

White now threatens to take the e-pawn.

1...e3!

Black has to push the pawn forward in order not to lose it.

2.Be4!...

This move frees the f4 Knight from guarding his companion at g2 so that he can stop the advance of the e-pawn.

2.Nh4? g2 =

2...g5

Black decides to push the Knight away and the reply is obvious. The following ending is now very fine.

3.Ne2+ Kf1

4.Bf3!...

This is the only move to win.

4. ..g4!

4...Be1 5.Ke4 Kf2 6.Nxe1+-

If the Bishop moves then White loses a Knight and the ending is drawn.

5.Kf4!...

5.Ke4? Bg1 6.Nxg3+ Kf2 7.Nh1+ Kf1=

5...gxf3

Black could hold out longer by playing: 5...Bg1 6. Kxg4+ Bh2 7. Nxe3+ Kf2 9.Nxg3++-

6.Kxf3 Be1

6...Bg1 7.Nxg3#

7.Nxe3#

The positional imitation of a symmetrical mating variation on the g or e-files is very impressive and is known as an "echo". This now leads me into a new feature for the coming year. Walter Veitch has kindly agreed to contribute the occasional short piece of analysis on a study or a practical ending.

It is with great pleasure that I introduce to you:

Walter's Monthly Reflection

Zukertort vs Steinitz

London, 1883

7R/5k2/8/8/6P1/r6P/6K1/8 w

1.Rb8 Kg6; 2.Rb5 Rc3; 3.Re5 Ra3; 4.h4 Rb3; 5.h5+ Kh6; 6.Rf5 Ra3; 7.Rf3 Ra1.

Analysing is often a puzzling business. Take for example the above position which I came across in my youth. Clearly the White Rook should aim to get to f3. It is also useful to hold back the Black King. So 1.Rh6 (with g5 to follow) or Rh5 is obvious. But instead White played 1.Rb8? which does nothing about anything and it takes 5 moves for the Rook to get to f3. As a diffident learner I kept wondering about the hidden purpose of the Rook moves, now I merely wonder how text book after text book can feature this position without saying one word about the inefficient method employed or without at least showing the position after the Rook has played to b8.


I am taking a short break and will be back on Sunday January 2nd with Position 121.

Thanks for Your Support.

 The Seasons Greetings to you all.

Gens Una Sumas.


Christmas Endgame Solving Tournament.

Click here >> positions Have a go !!

* www.chessending.com *
COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the new year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. Join now to book a place and get some practice. Present active cumulative participants will have priority of entry. This event will run from 2/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year.

Winners will be announced in January 2001.


Newcomers are welcomed to take part in the cumulative competition.
   

Click here for the NEW weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Henryk Kalafut of the United States wins in November.

The December competition ends with Position 120.

All scores will then be set to zero ready for Cumulative 2000.


Important Dates


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.The MILLENNIUM COMPETITION closes with the Christmas event. No new participant can be considered for the prize.


ARCHIVES

12/12/99

Position 118

L. Steiner

5/12/99

Position117

Havasi

28/11/99

Position116

Aronin

21/11/99

Position 115

Gorgiev

14/11/99

Position 114

Charousek

7/11/99

Position113

Dawson

31/10/99

Position112

Taimanov

24/10/99

Position 111

Zukertort

17/10/99

Position 110

Torre

10/10/99

Position 109

Philidor

3/10/99

Position 108

Panov

26/9/99

Position 107

Herbstmann

19/9/99

Position 106

Steinitz

12/9/99

Position 105

I. Horowitz

5/9/99

Position 104

O'Kelly

29/8/99

Position 103

Gurvich

22/8/99

Position 102

Prins

15/8/99

Position 101

Peckover

8/8/99

Position 100

Mikenas

1/8/99

Position 99

Roycroft

25/7/99

Position 98

Sultan Khan

Pre 25/7/99 Archives

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