PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

2/1/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Paul Cheng, Giallombardo and Eric Bentzen.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 121

White to play & DRAW

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p6p/7n/3P4/5K2/7P/7P/7k: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 120

Vlastimil Hort (1944- ) Czech Grandmaster. A very gifted player but he lacked the drive to stay among the world's top ten. He was a Candidate in 1977 but lost to Spassky in a close match (+1=13-2). In 1980 with Jansa he wrote The Best Move which contains 230 positions to solve, many of which are endings. This book received high praise from reviewers but unfortunately the writing partnership of these two Czech grandmasters was never repeated.

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p4p1k/np4pp/4P3/2R1B3/P3KP2/6PP/3r4:

This position shows the importance of having centralized pieces. The White forces have greater mobility because they control the central squares. The only positive factor in Blacks position is the position of his Rook which White will try to neutralize. The White King is beautifully placed in the centre because it can quickly go too where the action is. The position of the relative Kings can often be the deciding factor in endings with few pieces.

1.e6! ...

This pawn sacifice opens up the 7th rank for the Rook.

1.Kg7? 2.e7! Queening in the next move.

1.Ra4 also seems to win but is not as convincing as the main line: 1...Nc5 (1... Nc7 2.Rxa7 Rc1 3.a4+- 1...Nb8 2.Rxa7 Rd7 3.Ra8+-) 2. Rxa7 Kg7 3.Ke2 Rd4! and Black can resist. 

1...fxe6

2.Ra4 Nc5

3.Rxa7+...

3...Kg8? 4.Bxg6+- The ending is hopeless for Black.

3...Rd7

4.Rxd7+ Nxd7

Now the centralized King becomes an important fighting piece and wins the ending.

5.Kd4!...

If 5.Bc6? then 5...Ne5! 6.Bb5 Kg7 7.Kd4 Nf7 with the idea of 7...Kf6 and Black holds on.

5... Kg7

6.Kc4 Nf6

7.Kb5+-

White wins.

The b-pawn cannot be defended adequately and White will win with the passed a-pawn. 

  The Seasons Greetings to you all.

Gens Una Sumas.

* www.chessending.com *
COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 2/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

Winners will be announced in January 2001.


Click here for the NEW weekly >>
CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Paul Cheng tie with Tina & Hassan Aitlahcen on 36 points to win in December. Paul Berelos comes second with 31 points. Giallombardo comes 3rd with 10 points.

Congratulations to Paul Cheng who is the overall winner because he has climbed the ladder 3 times.

All scores will now be set to zero for Cumulative 2000 which starts NOW !! 


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.


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