PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

16/1/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Alexander Vojna, Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, Mike Fitch  and Federico Giallombardo
THIS WEEK

POSITION 123

White to play & DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:4Bk2/5p2/2K5/1p3P2/2b2P2/8/1n6/2N5: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 122

Wolfgang Unzicker (1925- ) After the Second World War, Wolfgang was West Germany's strongest grandmaster. He won 7 National Championships and represented his country in 13 Olympiads. He had a fine tournament record; 1st at Augsburg, 1st at Hastings 1950/51, 1st at Maribor 1967, 1st at Almador 1988. His best result was probably =4th at Santa Monica in 1966 where he was up against world class opposition.

Unzicker vs Lundin, 1954

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:R7/8/P4pp1/5k1p/7P/r4PP1/4K3/8: 

Many years ago Tarrasch put forward an important rule to do with the conduct of the Rooks in these type of endings. A Rook should always be deployed behind a passed pawn. The position of the Rook at a8 is not ideal but White still wins because Black has a serious weakness at g6 and the King is badly placed at f5. White has a simple plan to march the King over to h6. The pawn move 1.a7! is played first because it ties the Black forces down; neither the King or the pawns can move. The weaker side always has to watch out for the Rook check from the back rank followed by the queening of the a-pawn.

1.a7! Ra2+

After 1...Ra6 2.Kd3 playing the Rook to the side of the pawn does not help in the defence 2...Rd6+ 3.Kc4 Rd7 4.Kb5! Re7 5.Kc6! Re6+ 6.Kd7 Ra6 7.Ke7 and he still gets to h6.

2.Kd3 Ra1

3.Kd4 Ra5

4.Kc4 Ra3

5.Kc5 Ra1

5...Rxf3? 6.Rf8 Ra3 7.a8Q Rxa8 8.Rxa8 Kg4 9.Ra3 g5 10.hxg5 fxg5 11.Kd4 h4 12.gxh4 gxh4 13.Ke3 Kg3 14.Ra8+- the h-pawn is easily stopped.

6.Kd6 Ra6+

6...Ra3?? was played in the game and should have been punished with 7.Rc8!!; Black can resign. He faces the threat of mate and the queening of the a-pawn. Alas this move was missed and play continued similar to the main line.

7.Ke7 Ra5

8.Kf8 Ra6

9.Kf7 Ra3

10.Kg7 Ra1

No better is 10...g5 11.hxg5 Kxg5 12.Kf7 Kf5 13.g4+ hxg4 14.fxg4+ White wins easily.

11.Kh6! Ra6

White now trades the a-pawn for a winning advantage on the kingside.

12.Rb8 Rxa7

13.Rb5+ Ke6

14.Kxg6 Ra8

15.Kxh5 Rg8

16.g4 Rh8+

17.Kg6 wins

The White Rook at a8 and the pawn at a7 and its mirror positions is a feature which often occurs in Rook endings. Analysis of the basic positions by Berger, Cheron, Tarrash, Puder, Clausen and V Platov can be found in most endgame texts. Such knowledge will increase our confidence and will help us with the more difficult practical examples.

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CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Paul Cheng tie with Tina & Hassan Aitlahcen on 36 points to win in December. Paul Berelos comes second with 31 points. Giallombardo comes 3rd with 10 points.

Congratulations to Paul Cheng who is the overall winner because he has climbed the ladder 3 times.

Cumulative 2000 starts NOW !! 

COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 2/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

Winners will be announced in January 2001.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced in FEBRUARY 2000. The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.


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