PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

30/1/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Alexander Vojna, Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, and Federico Giallombardo
THIS WEEK

POSITION 125

White to play & DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:n1bq3r/1p1p1K1p/1p1P3p/k6P/pp1R3P/2PP4/5B2/2Q5:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 124

Erich Eliskases (1913- ) International Grandmaster. Shared the Austrian championship at the age of 16 and then in 1932 succeeded in winning a match against Spielmann. After the annexation of Austria, he found himself playing for Germany. He won both the 1938 and 1939 German championships. The outbreak of the Second World War meant the end of his European chess career. After the 1939 Olympiad, like many other players he found himself stranded in Buenos Aries; so he decided to settle in South America and had reasonable success there. 

Eliskases vs  Brauer,

Correspondence, 1933 

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1p1b4/6k1/2Pp3p/3P1p1P/8/6PK/5B2:

The above position is a classic example of the "bad Bishop" syndrome. Blacks Bishop is limited by his own pawns and cannot attack whites. Because the pawns and the Bishop are of the same colour Black suffers from a "colour weakness" which allows the enemy monarch to operate along the dark squares. In contrast Whites Bishop is strong because it stands on a different colour to its pawns and so they complement each other. Also Black's pawns are all isolated and therefore weaker than the opponents pawns.

White seeks to exchange the only pawn on a white square.

1.g3! Bg4

This was the move played in the game. There is not much to choose between the alternatives: 1...f3 It may seem like a good idea to have a passer but it is weak and will be a target. 2.Kg1 Bg4 3.Kf2 Kf5 4.Bd3+ Kf6 5.Bc2 and the f-pawn is lost. 1...fxg3+ 2.Kxg3 Kf6 3.Kf4 Bf5 4.Bb5 Bg4 5.Be8! Ke7 6.Ba4! Kf6 7.Bb3! Be6 8.Bd1 Bf7 9.Bf3! +- ; 1...Kf5 2.Bh3+ Ke4 3.Bxd7 fxg3+ 4.Kxg3 Kxd4 5.Kf4 Kxc5 6.Ke5 b5 7.Be8 b4 7.Bxh5 d4 9.Bd1 Kc4 10.h5 d3 11.Ke4 d2 12.Ke3! and White wins; 1...Be6 2.gxf4 Kf5 3.Bh3+ Kf6 4.Bg2 Kf5 5.Kg3+-;

2.Bg2! f3

Black has a passer but it is weak.

If 2...Be6 3.gxf4! Kf5 4.Kg3 Kf6 5.Kf3! +-

3.Bf1 Kf5

4.Bd3+ Ke6

White now starts to attack the weak f-pawn.

5.Kg1! Kd7

6.Kf2 Kc6

7.Bc2!...

Threatening 8.Bd1 and the end of the f-pawn 7...Kb5 8.Bb3! Be6 9.Ke3 Kb4 10.Bd1! Kc3 11.Bxf3 Bf7 12.g4 +-

7... b6

8.cxb6 Kxb6

9.Bd1 Be6

The f-pawn falls and now it is a simple win. 10.Bxf3 Bf7 11.Ke3 Kb5 12.Kf4 Kb4! 13.Ke5 Kc4 14.Bh1! Bg8 15.Bg2! Bf7 16.Bf3 Kd3 17.Bxd5 WINS.

A few years later at Semmering-Baden Eliskases obtained a same coloured Bishop ending against the former World Champion Capablanca. The Cuban made a rare mistake in defence and Eliskases played a beautiful ending to take the full point. 


Walter's Monthly Reflection

Frank Brady in his book "The life and Games of Bobby Fischer " quotes comments by Barden and Kotov comparing the endgame skill of Fischer in the 1962 Stockholm Interzonal to that of Capablanca and adds: "These appreciations of Bobby's endgame technique are rather ironic, since he never studies it. His theoretical preparation - which he regards as about 50% of chess ability - is almost wholly confined to analysis of the openings. Still, at Bled in 1961, he defeated Petrosian, perhaps the contemporary master of endgame strategy and beat him in the endgame!"

Fischer vs Petrosian

Bled, 1961

White to play  

FORSYTH NOTATION: BR6/2k2pp1/4pn1p/2P5/1p6/1K4Pr/PP6/8:

After an uninspiring opening Petrosian chooses a line leading to this double edged position. Play went 35. Rb7+ Kc6 36. Kc4 Black Resigns! Frank comments: "Black walks into a mating net. After 35...Kc8 the issue would still be in doubt". Here the term "mating net" is not quite accurate. Black in fact walked into a simple mate. 

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CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Paul Cheng tie with Tina & Hassan Aitlahcen on 36 points to win in December. Paul Berelos comes second with 31 points. Giallombardo comes 3rd with 10 points.

Congratulations to Paul Cheng who is the overall winner because he has climbed the ladder 3 times.

Cumulative 2000 starts NOW !! 

COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 2/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

Winners will be announced in February 2001.


  SPECIAL MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The competitor's 3 highest scores only will count. The winner will be announced on FEBRUARY 20th . The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.


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