PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 13/2/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Alexander Vojna, Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, Mike Fitch, and Federico Giallombardo.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 127

White to play & WIN 

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/8/8/p1N5/2Kp4/P2P4/1p6/1k6:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 126

Vasily Smyslov (1921- ) Soviet International Grandmaster. World Champion 1957-8. In his endgame play at his very best he comes close to Capablanca and Rubinstein. Smyslov in his youth learnt a lot from his father who was a strong player. In his coaching there was emphasis on the understanding of simple positions and of what each piece was capable of achieving. To Smyslov, both, music (which was his other passion) and chess follow the intangible rules of beauty and harmony. Chess to him was more than a sport or a science but supremely an expression of art.

Keller vs Smyslov

Lucerne, 1985

Black to play & DRAW

FORSYTH NOTATION:2Q5/8/6k1/2B5/4q1P1/K7/8/8:

In these type of endings where the Kings have no or little pawn cover against the checks it is difficult to assess the outcome of the variations. Here Whites winning attempt is based on trying to advance and queen his g-pawn. In this difficult position Blacks only hope is to play actively. His Queen on the centralized square e4, and his active King on the g-file are well placed to meet White's threat. It is often the relative positions of the Queens that are the deciding factor.

1... Kg5!

1... Qd3+ also draws but not as clear as the main line. 2.Kb4 Qd2+ 3.Kc4 Qc2+ 4.Kd4 Qd2+ 5.Ke4 Qc2+ 6.Kd5 . Qb3+ 7.Kd6 Qd3+ 8.Ke7 Qe4+ 9.Kf8 Qf3+ 10. Ke8 Qf7+ White cannot avoid the exchange of Queens followed by the loss of the g-pawn.

2. Qg8+ Kh4!

2...Kf4!? also draws. 3. g5! Kg4 4. g6 Kg5! 5. g7 Kg6! 6. Qf8 (6. Bf8 Qa8+! =) 6... Qd3+ 7. Kb4 Qb1+ 8. Kc4 Qa2+ 9. Kd3 Qa6+! 10. Ke3 Qe6+ 11. Kf4 Qc4+ 12.Ke5 Qe2+ White cannot escape the checks.

2...Kh6? 3.Bf8#;

2...Kf6? 3.g5+ Ke5 4.Qe8+ wins.

3. Bf2+ Kh3

4. g5 Kg4

The King goes after the pawn.

5. g6 Kg5!

6. g7 Kg6

7.Qf8 Qd3+

There is no escape from perptual check or the loss of the g-pawn.

8. Kb4 Qd2+ 9. Kc4 Qc2+ 10. Kd5 Qa2+ 11.Ke5 (11.Kd6 Qd2+ 12.Ke5 Qe2+ draw)Qe2+ 12. Kd5 Qa2+13. Ke4 Qc2+ 14. Kf3 Qc3+ DRAW.

A wonderful save by a former World champion who helped to shape the history of chess in the 20th century. More examples of his brilliant techniqe can be found in Vasily Smyslov: Endgame Virtuoso. by Vasily Smyslov. Cadogon 1997.


  MILLENNIUM ENDGAME SOLVING COMPETITION

The winner will be announced on FEBRUARY 20th & Solutions will be published . The prize will be £100 or equivalent. In the case of a tie the prize will be shared.


Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Alexander Vojna and Henryk Kalafut win in January with maximum score.

Paul Cheng comes second and sends his Best Wishes for the year of the Dragon !!

Peter Bereolos makes a successful return and we welcome newcomer Leonard Dickerson.


COMPETITIONS 2000

Two major competitions for the year

1. Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

2. Cumulative 2000. Prizes: 1st £50 or equivalent, 2nd £30, 3rd £20; Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 2/1/2000 to 30/12/2000. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

Winners will be announced in February 2001.


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Pre 25/7/99 Archives

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