PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 27/2/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, Mike Fitch, Leonard Dickerson and Olivier Scalbert. 
THIS WEEK

POSITION 129

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:7b/6k1/8/8/K3b3/8/B6R/8: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 128

Efim Bogoljobow (1889-1952) World Title Challenger 1929, 1934. Started as a Russian player but emigrated to Germany in 1925. During the 1920's he had some great tournament successes i.e. Moscow 1925 and genuinely deserved his first title match against Alekhine. The second match was controversial because by this time other players had arrived on the scene who had a superior claim to a title contest. Capablanca was back at his best play and he also deserved a return match. Although Bogoljobow never really stood a chance against Alekhine, he lost by -8+3=15, he let some golden opportunities slip by:

World Championship 1934

Bogoljobow vs Alekhine,

Game 1,

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:2R5/8/8/8/5P2/1p1k1KPP/r7/8: 

At the right moment White will give up his Rook for the b-pawn. This ending is won because the Black King  is too far away to help in the blockading of the passed pawns.

 1.Rb8 b2

2.f5!...

White pushes his most forward pawn. No time must be lost.

2... Kc2

The King guards the pawn and thus frees the Rook from passive defence. Blacks only hope of extending the game is to force the exchange of the White Rook for the b-pawn and play against the passed pawns.

3.Ke4...

The f-pawn has to be shepherded by the King.

3... Ra4+

4.Ke5 Ra3

The Rook threatens to cover the b-file so that the pawn can queen. White now goes into a favourable ending of connected passed pawns against a Rook.

5.Rxb2+ Kxb2

6.g4 Rxh3

7.g5 ...

7...Rg3 8.Kf4 Rg2 9.f6 Kc3 10.Kf5+-;

7...Re3+ 8.Kf4 Re1 9.f6 Rg1 10.Kf5 Rf1+ 11.Kg6 Kc3 12.f7 Kd4 13.Kg7 Ke5 14.g6+-

7...Kc3 8.f6 Rg3 9.f7 Rxg5+ 10.Ke4 Rg4+ 11.Ke3 Rg3+ 12.Kf2 WINS

Alas these moves were never played ! The position shown above was abandoned as a draw. This win was first pointed out by the former world champion, Emanuel Lasker who wrote a book on the match published by Printing-Craft Ltd in 1935. Bogoljobow let himself down on a matter of theory and technique. A loss in the first game of the match would have been a severe shock to Alekhine but not enough perhaps to alter the final outcome of the match.


 

 

 Vojna Alexander, Henryk Kalafut

and Patrick Peschlow win the

Christmas solving competition and so share

the millennium prize.

 

 

SCORE: A

The overall scores:

Patrick Peschlow GERMANY

Henryk Kalafut USA/POLAND

Vojna Alexander UKRAINE

David Rowe ENGLAND

Mike Fitch USA

Peter Bereolos USA

Federico Giallombardo ITALY

 

  AA A B+B+

A AA B+

A AA

 B+B+B

B+B+

B+

B

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

Alexander Vojna and Henryk Kalafut win in January with maximum score.

Paul Cheng comes second and sends his Best Wishes for the year of the Dragon !!

Peter Bereolos makes a successful return and we welcome newcomer Leonard Dickerson.


ARCHIVES

20/2/00

Position 127

Ellison

13/2/00

Position 126

Smyslov

6/2/00

Position 125

Simkovitch

30/1/00

Position 124

Eliskases

23/1/00

Position 123

Kasparyan

16/1/00

Position 122

Unzicker

9/1/00

Position 121

Yakimchik

2/1/00

Position 120

Hort

19/12/99

Position 119

Veitch

12/12/99

Position 118

L. Steiner

5/12/99

Position117

Havasi

28/11/99

Position116

Aronin

21/11/99

Position 115

Gorgiev

14/11/99

Position 114

Charousek

7/11/99

Position113

Dawson

31/10/99

Position112

Taimanov

24/10/99

Position 111

Zukertort

17/10/99

Position 110

Torre

10/10/99

Position 109

Philidor

3/10/99

Position 108

Panov

26/9/99

Position 107

Herbstmann

19/9/99

Position 106

Steinitz

12/9/99

Position 105

I. Horowitz

5/9/99

Position 104

O'Kelly

29/8/99

Position 103

Gurvich

22/8/99

Position 102

Prins

15/8/99

Position 101

Peckover

8/8/99

Position 100

Mikenas

1/8/99

Position 99

Roycroft

25/7/99

Position 98

Sultan Khan

Pre 25/7/99 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS