PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 26/3/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, Federico Giallombardo and Olivier Scalbert. 
THIS WEEK

POSITION 133

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:1k6/8/r2K4/8/8/8/p7/Q7:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 132

Aaron Nimzowitsch, (1886-1935). Born in Riga but eventually settled in Denmark. Founder of the Hypermodern movement in Chess. Probably the most brilliant chess theoretician of the last century. He revolted against Tarrasch and the Classical School of Chess and through his books, My System and Chess Praxis put forward his own ideas. Many of his concepts gradually became accepted and what was once revolutionary has now become main stream theory. 

Nimzowitsch vs Tarrasch

Kissingen, 1928

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:4b3/1k2B2p/1p6/5p2/2p1p3/7P/PPP2PPK/8:

Here Nimzowitsch is playing his old adversary, Tarrasch and we can only imagine what feelings this game must have produced between the players. In most circumstances Black, although a pawn minus would have good drawing chances in the ending of opposite coloured Bishops but White has seen a subtle way to win.

1.Kg3 Kc8

White is going to attack the weak pawns and Black must respond.

2.Kf4 Kd7

3.Bb4 Ke6

4.Bc3 Bd7

4....Bg6 and White wins by creating a passed pawn on both sides of the board: 5.Kg5 Kd5 6.h4 b5 7.b3 cxb3 8.cxb3 Kc5 9.a4 bxa4 10.bxa4 Kb6 11.h5 Be8 12.a5+ Ka6 13.Kxf5 Bxh5 14.Kxe4 +-

5.g3 b5

6.Kg5 Kf7

7.h4 Bc8

8.Kh6 Kg8

Black's King has been drawn as far as possible from the queenside. White will eventually create a passed pawn from his queenside majority.

9.b3 cxb3

10.cxb3 Bd7

In the game Tarrasch played 10....f4 11.gxf4 Bd7 12.Kg5 Kf7 13.f5 Bc6 14.Kf4 Ke7 15.Ke5 and White wins.

11.Be5!...

11...Bc8 12.a4 bxa4 13.bxa4 Bd7 14.a5 Bc8 15.Bd6 Ba6 16.Kg5 Bc8 17.Kf6 +-

11...Be8 12.Kg5 Bd7 13.Kf6 Kf8 14.Bd6+ Kg8 15.Ke7 Bc6 16.Ke6 Kg7 17.Kxf5 Kf7 18.Bc5 Kg7 19.Ke6 Kg6 20.g4 Kg7 21.h5 Kg8 22.Ke7 Kg7 23.Bd4+ Kg8 24.h6 Bb7 25.a4! and White gets a passed pawn which will cost the Bishop. 

Nimzowitsch in his first book put forward his teaching about the Blockade (1925). The problem of the blockade is something which we face in nearly every ending. How are we to stop the pawns lust to expand? Which piece is going to be the blockader? How are we to organize our pieces against the opponents pawns? In this book he sought to answer those type of questions. Nimzowitsch's teaching made a deep impact on former World Champion, Petrosian the influence of which we can see in many of his games.


Paul Cheng of China wins in February.

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